Hero Leeds boy who saved brother's life up for second award

A quick thinking Gipton teenager who saved his brother's life after  horrendous cycling accident is a finalist in a second awards ceremony.
Jack Smith pictured (right) with his brother Connor Osborne.Jack Smith pictured (right) with his brother Connor Osborne.
Jack Smith pictured (right) with his brother Connor Osborne.

Jack Smith, who saved brother Connor Osborne, ha been named as a finalist in the Amplifon Awards for Brave Britons 2020.

Connor became impaled on the handlebars of his BMX bike in Roundhay Park in July 2018.

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One end of the handlebar had impaled Connor’s stomach, just missing his vital organs, but he had severed a femoral vein in his thigh, causing major bleeding.

Jack Smith is pictured (third from left) with his brother Connor Osborne, army cadet leader Cameron Tosh and Jack and Connor's mother Emma Osborne.Jack Smith is pictured (third from left) with his brother Connor Osborne, army cadet leader Cameron Tosh and Jack and Connor's mother Emma Osborne.
Jack Smith is pictured (third from left) with his brother Connor Osborne, army cadet leader Cameron Tosh and Jack and Connor's mother Emma Osborne.

Jack, who was 14 at the time, saw 13-year-old Connor was bleeding heavily from the stomach and groin.

Jack, 16, who had learned first aid at Army Cadets, ripped off his shirt and applied pressure to the wound to stem the blood flow.

While on the phone to 999, he continued to apply pressure and reassure his brother until the ambulance arrived.

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Jack was honoured last year by the St John Ambulance, winning one of their prestigious Everyday Heroes Awards.

He was announced as a winner in the Young Hero category at a ceremony hosted by the health charity at the Hilton London Bankside in October 2019.

Now Jack has reached the last four of the Young Hero category in global hearing specialist Amplifon’s search for ‘The Best Of British’.

Jack said: “I was in the army cadet force at the time so I had done first aid training. I knew I had to stem the bleed because Connor was losing quite a lot of blood.

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“I remember feeling really worried when we were in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. I was scared Connor was going to die.”

Connor was taken by ambulance Leeds General Infirmary. He was taken onto the surgical ward as he had damaged his femoral vein and went to theatre at midnight to close

the wound.

Jack said: “If it happened again I wouldn’t hesitate to do the same. Even if it wasn’t my brother and it was a complete stranger, I would jump in and help because it could save their

life.”

Jack and Connor’s mum Emma Osborne said: “If it wasn’t for Jack, Connor might not be here today.

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“I count my lucky stars every day that Connor is still here and there is no one prouder of Jack than myself, his dad and our family.”

At the time, Jack had a major heart problem that he did not know about. He had surgery in July this year to fix the hole in his heart and recovered well.

However, during his time in intensive care, he said he related to how Connor must have felt after his accident.

Jack said: “After my heart surgery in July, I felt like I understood how scared Connor must have felt when he was in hospital, and in a way, what it was like for him.”

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Jack has been invited to the virtual awards presentation on Tuesday, October 13, when Radio 5 Live breakfast presenter Rachel Burden will host the event, and Falklands War hero

Simon Weston will be guest of honour.