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10 ways how Leeds has changed the world

Leeds is amazing, we know that.

From revolutionising pop music to designing the White House, the world simply wouldn’t be the same without Leeds. Here are nine ways your city changed the world. READ MORE: The 34 never seen before photos of Leeds through the ages | 10 best kept Leeds secrets even some locals won't know about

Pudsey-born Benjamin Henry Latrobe was heavily involved in designing large sections of the White House with James Hoban and Thomas Jefferson, including the east & west colonnades, which give the buildings fascia its iconic look.

1. We designed the White House

Pudsey-born Benjamin Henry Latrobe was heavily involved in designing large sections of the White House with James Hoban and Thomas Jefferson, including the east & west colonnades, which give the buildings fascia its iconic look.
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Without Mel Bs brash Leeds attitude, the Spice Girls may never have made it off the the drawing board.  Scary Spice led the quintet through the doors of several other labels, before signing with Simon Fuller.

2. Leeds helped give the world Girl Power

Without Mel Bs brash Leeds attitude, the Spice Girls may never have made it off the the drawing board. Scary Spice led the quintet through the doors of several other labels, before signing with Simon Fuller.
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Marks & Spencer was established as a humble market stall on Kirkgate Market in 1884 and has grown into one of the countrys biggest and most trusted retailers.

3. Leeds gave the world Marks & Spencer

Marks & Spencer was established as a humble market stall on Kirkgate Market in 1884 and has grown into one of the countrys biggest and most trusted retailers.
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The television studios on Kirkstall Road were the first in Europe to design and build purpose-built colour studios, the first to try breakfast television as we now know it, and were the first station to go 24-hour in 1986.

4. Leeds changed TV forever

The television studios on Kirkstall Road were the first in Europe to design and build purpose-built colour studios, the first to try breakfast television as we now know it, and were the first station to go 24-hour in 1986.
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