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11 philanthropists who made their mark on Leeds

The city of Leeds has been shaped by philanthropy.

Here we look at selfless giving and the legacy 11 philanthropists left the city. READ MORE: The 34 never seen before photos of Leeds through the ages | Historic Briggate in 26 photos: The street Leeds we all know and love | The seven lost wonders of Leeds

Born in Hunslet this self-made millionaire was responsible for buying and then donating Kirkstall Abbey to the city. He amassed a fortune by cornering the world market in nitrate, which was in great demand to make explosives.

1. Colonel John Thomas North (1841-1896)

Born in Hunslet this self-made millionaire was responsible for buying and then donating Kirkstall Abbey to the city. He amassed a fortune by cornering the world market in nitrate, which was in great demand to make explosives.
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A wealthy merchant who founded St Johns Church in 1631 and paid for a new market cross in 1619. Harrison Street, which links New Briggate and Vicar Lane with the site of the Grand Theatre, is named after him.

2. John Harrison (1579-1656)

A wealthy merchant who founded St Johns Church in 1631 and paid for a new market cross in 1619. Harrison Street, which links New Briggate and Vicar Lane with the site of the Grand Theatre, is named after him.
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Wealthy and ambitious he paid for the City Square statue of the Black Prince, which was carved in Holland and brought to the city via barge. Was also the main benefactor of Leeds Art Gallery.

3. Colonel Thomas Walter Harding (1843-1927)

Wealthy and ambitious he paid for the City Square statue of the Black Prince, which was carved in Holland and brought to the city via barge. Was also the main benefactor of Leeds Art Gallery.
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An eccentric businessman who built Temple Works, a building whose design was based upon the Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt. It had a grass roof, complete with grazing sheep.

4. John Marshall (1765-1845)

An eccentric businessman who built Temple Works, a building whose design was based upon the Temple of Horus at Edfu, Egypt. It had a grass roof, complete with grazing sheep.
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