This is how many people have survived coronavirus - and the recovery rate explained

Friday, 13th March 2020, 3:00 pm
Updated Friday, 13th March 2020, 3:01 pm

The UK government has announced that the country has moved from the "containment" phase of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, to the "delay" stage.

Businesses across the world are feeling financial strain, with everything from international conferences, flights, shops, hotels, and Broadway shows being closed or cancelled.

The worst wave of the Covid-19 strain of coronavirus is predicted to hit the UK within the next two weeks. As the number of confirmed cases continues to rise, what is the recovery rate of Covid-19 and how many people have fully recovered?

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18 people recovered in the UK

As of Friday 13 March, there have been 596 confirmed cases of Covid-19 across the UK, but health officials have said they believe the actual number of people infected could be between 5,000 and 10,000.

Ten people have now died in the UK from the disease that broke out in China last November, but at least 18 people have fully recovered from the virus.

According to the Johns Hopkins University Centre for Systems Science and Engineering, more than 126,000 people globally have now been confirmed to have contracted the coronavirus, out of whom 67,000 have recovered, and more than 4,600 have died.

This cumulative total is not how many people are carrying the virus. The number is more likely to be about 60,000 people. Almost half of the people who have contracted Covid-19 have now recovered.

90 per cent of people over 80 have recovered

So far deaths are most common within the elderly population. Medical staff who are exposed to the virus are also a high risk case for contracting Covid-19. But, even when it comes to those over 80 years old, 90 per cent will recover. The mortality rate is around one per cent of those who contract the virus.

According to The Guardian, "The World Health Organization’s director general, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, talked of 3.4%, but his figure was calculated by dividing the number of deaths by the number of officially confirmed cases."

"We know there are many more mild cases that do not get to hospital and are not being counted, which would bring the mortality rate significantly down."