Joe Biden has won the US presidential election - the results in full

By Finlay Greig
Saturday, 7th November 2020, 4:31 pm
Updated Monday, 9th November 2020, 10:04 am

Joe Biden has won the US presidency.

The Democrat candidate in the 2020 US Election claimed Pennsylvania, which pushed him over 270 Electoral College Votes.

Vote counting is still ongoing in several states and the current incumbent has launched several lawsuits in states won - or set to be won - by the former Vice President. The claims of fraudulent voting by Donald Trump are without base, however.

But here's what we know about the results in each state so far, as called by the Associated Press

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    US Election results

    Alabama - AP calls for Trump, 9 electoral votes

    Alaska - The Associated Press has not called this race, 3 electoral votes

    Arizona - AP calls for Biden, 11 electoral votes

    Arkansas - AP calls for Trump, 6 electoral votes

    California - AP calls for Biden, 55 electoral votes

    Colorado - AP calls for Biden, 9 electoral votes

    Connecticut - AP calls for Biden, 7 electoral votes

    Delaware - AP calls for Biden, 3 electoral votes

    District of Columbia (D.C.) - AP calls for Biden, 3 electoral votes

    Florida - AP calls for Trump, 29 electoral votes

    Georgia - The Associated Press has not called this race, 16 electoral votes

    Hawaii - AP calls for Biden, 4 electoral votes

    Idaho - AP calls for Trump, 4 electoral votes

    Illinois - AP calls for Biden, 20 electoral votes

    Indiana - AP calls for Trump, 11 electoral votes

    Iowa - AP calls for Trump, 6 electoral votes

    Kansas - AP calls for Trump, 6 electoral votes

    Kentucky - AP calls for Trump, 8 electoral votes

    Louisiana - AP calls for Trump, 8 electoral votes

    Maine - AP calls 3 electoral votes to Biden, 1 to Trump

    Maryland - AP calls for Biden, 10 electoral votes

    Massachusetts - AP calls for Biden, 11 electoral votes

    Michigan - AP calls for Biden, 16 electoral votes

    Minnesota - AP calls for Biden, 10 electoral votes

    Mississippi - AP calls for Trump, 6 electoral votes

    Missouri - AP calls for Trump, 10 electoral votes

    Montana - AP calls for Trump, 3 electoral votes

    Nebraska - AP calls 4 electoral votes to Trump, 1 to Biden

    Nevada - The Associated Press has not called this race, 6 electoral votes

    New Hampshire - AP calls for Biden, 4 electoral votes

    New Jersey - The Associated Press has not called this race, 14 electoral votes

    New Mexico - AP calls for Biden, 5 electoral votes

    New York - AP calls for Biden, 29 electoral votes

    North Carolina - The Associated Press has not called this race, 15 electoral votes

    North Dakota - AP calls for Trump, 3 electoral votes

    Ohio - AP calls for Trump, 18 electoral votes

    Oklahoma - AP calls for Trump, 7 electoral votes

    Oregon - AP calls for Biden, 7 electoral votes

    Pennsylvania - AP calls for Biden, 20 electoral votes

    Rhode Island - AP calls for Biden, 4 electoral votes

    South Carolina - AP calls for Trump, 9 electoral votes

    South Dakota - AP calls for Trump, 3 electoral votes

    Tennessee - AP calls for Trump, 11 electoral votes

    Texas - AP calls for Trump, 38 electoral votes

    Utah - AP calls for Trump, 6 electoral votes

    Vermont - AP calls for Biden, 3 electoral votes

    Virginia - AP calls for Biden, 13 electoral votes

    Washington - AP calls for Biden, 12 electoral votes

    West Virginia - AP calls for Trump, 5 electoral votes

    Wisconsin - AP calls for Biden. 10 electoral votes

    Wyoming - AP calls for Trump, 3 electoral votes

    When does the president get inaugurated?

    The new president is always inaugurated on January 20, a date which is enshrined in the US constitution.

    Inauguration Day is a huge ceremony hosted at the US Capitol building in Washington, DC.

    The vice president-elect is sworn into office first, followed by the president who takes the oath of office:

    “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States.”

    This is then followed by the president’s inaugural address. It’s traditional for the president to speak to the country and outline their plans for the next term.

    What now for Donald Trump?

    Traditionally, the loser of a presidential election has conceded victory with a pre-prepared speech, wishing the victor well and providing assurance of a peaceful transfer of power.

    Mr Trump has already prematurely declared himself the winner of the election, and alleged widespread voting fraud without any evidence, but he would be breaking from a 124-year tradition if he was not to deliver a concession speech.

    It has been suggested that by failing to do so he would undermine the election results and potentially lead to civil unrest.

    Following her defeat to Trump in 2016 following a bitter campaign, Hillary Clinton delivered a concession speech, addressing supporters: "I know how disappointed you feel because I feel it too, Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead.

    "Our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer of power and we don't just respect that, we cherish it.”

    Between now and January 2, when congress is sworn in, President Donald Trump will service as president in what is known as a lame-duck session.

    During this time the president will, in theory at least, prepare to hand power over to Joe Biden, ensuring as smooth a transition of power as possible.

    Trump could opt to leave a few final gifts for the Republican party during this lame-duck session, swearing in judicial nominees. The life appointment of federal judges could help to assure conservative control of federal courts for years to come.

    On January 20, 2021, Joe Biden will be sworn in as the 46th US president.

    Prior to the inauguration Biden and his family members will visit the White House where, in theory, they will be greeted by Mr Trump and his family.

    Following this union, Mr Trump and Mr Biden will share a limousine motorcade to the Capitol for the inaugural ceremony.

    Mr Trump, like Mr Obama did in 2017, will be expected to attend the ceremony.

    The Trumps are then expected to take part in a departure ceremony from the White House’s East Wing.