This is how much your Leeds council tax will go up from Monday for each tax band

Council tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how muchCouncil tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how much
Council tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how much
Council tax in Leeds is set to rise from Monday - and this is how much more you will pay from April 1.

Leeds council is increasing council tax rates for 2019-20 by 3.99 per cent, an increase of up to £124.93 per year per household compared to the year before.

The council says the increase is in response to rising demands on social care services and a cut in annual government funding of £266 million since 2010.

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The total increase is made up of 2.99 per cent council tax and a further 1 per cent in adult social care precept, money which the council says will support rising pressures on adult social care services.

Council tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how muchCouncil tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how much
Council tax is being increased from April 1 in Leeds - and this is how much

-> Average speed cameras will be switched on again on the M621 - this is when and whyIn response to higher demand for these services, in 2017-18 the government announced that local authorities with social care responsibilities would have new powers to increase council tax by up to an extra 2 per cent for adult social care.

For 2019-20, social care authorities are able to increase the adult social care precept by up to a further 3%.

The rise is estimated to increase council tax revenue by £15.1 million compared with the previous year, £3 million of which would be from the adult social care precept.

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The budget plan for 2019-20 details how the council intends to deliver £22.6 million of savings over the next 12 months.

How much will your council tax increase? This is how much more you will pay in every band

Band A

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £1,043.70 per year.

A 3.99% increase will see this rise to £1,085.34, an extra £41.64 per year per household or an extra £4.16 per month.

Band B

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £1,217.66.

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A 3.99% increase will see this rise to £1,266.24, an extra £48.58 per year.

Band C

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £1,391.60.

A 3.99% increase will see this rise to £1,447.12, an extra £55.52 per year.

Band D

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £1,565.56.

A 3.99% increase would see this rise to £1,628.03, an extra £62.47 per year.

Band E

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £1,913.45.

A 3.99% increase would see this rise to £1,989.80, an extra £76.35 per year.

Band F

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £2,261.36.

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A 3.99% increase would see this rise to £2,351.59, an extra £90.23 per year.

Band G

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £2,609.26.

A 3.99% increase would see this rise to £2,713.37, an extra £104.11 per year.

Band H

In 2018-19, council tax on Band A properties was £3,131.11.

A 3.99% increase would see this rise to £3,256.04, an extra £124.93 per year or £12.49 per month.

-> The rules on sick pay are changing in April - this is how it will affect youLeader of Leeds council, Councillor Judith Blake said: “Another very challenging year lies ahead with our funding being cut again and our costs rising.

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“In this climate the role of council tax becomes ever more important year on year, as it is needed to go further and further to protect front line services and support our most vulnerable residents.

“We also face significant financial uncertainty in the coming year as this is the last year of our funding agreement with the government and so far we have had no indication as to what happens next, which means we cannot plan ahead in the way we normally would, which is deeply frustrating and concerning.

“Despite these challenges, we continue to manage the council’s finances in the most prudent and robust way we can, constantly being open to new ideas, innovations and ways of working and doing everything we can to tackle poverty and inequality as a compassionate city with a strong economy.

“That approach will continue to guide everything we do over the next 12 months.”

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