Leeds woman saved from train platform gives birth to miracle baby after transforming life

A Leeds woman who was saved from a train platform just eight months ago has given birth to a miracle baby after overcoming her addictions.

By Daniel Sheridan
Thursday, 16th June 2022, 1:51 pm

Lyndsey Roberts, 30, was tackled to the ground by a man who spotted her just seconds before a train was due to pass at Crossgates Station in October 2021.

Lyndsey, from Halton Moor, told the YEP she had struggled with addictions to cocaine and alcohol in the past.

However, she has started to turn her life around in the eight months since the distressing incident.

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Lyndsey Roberts, 30, was tackled to the ground by a man who spotted her just seconds before a train was due to pass at Crossgates Station in October 2021.

Lyndsey, who gave birth to a son on June 14, said she had been drug and alcohol free since October.

Now she is looking forward to continuing her transformation and being the best mum possible to her new baby boy.

"It’s amazing to have my little boy", she said.

"He was born prematurely at 34 weeks and two days but he’s off everything already.

Lyndsey Roberts, 30, was tackled to the ground by a man who spotted her just seconds before a train was due to pass at Crossgates Station in October 2021.

"He is just a little jaundiced but should be off lights today.

"I didn’t want to drink or use drugs, I find it’s more of a depressant than a solution and it’s amazing [to not be using]."

Lyndsey is now going on a relapse prevention course for drugs and a relapse prevention work progress course for her mental health team.

Hayden Lee and his colleagues at Vulnerable Citizen Support CIC played a huge role in helping to save Lyndsey on the day.

The charity aims to help the most destitute people in society. It provides food parcels to struggling individuals and families as well as helping to find accommodation for anybody who needs it.

Their slogan is "Homeless Not Helpless".

On the day, Hayden called West Yorkshire Police and Network Rail to help prevent the tragedy.

Speaking to the YEP, he said: "My colleague was on the phone crying, shouting 'I have saved her, I have grabbed her'. We thought the worst.

"My colleague didn't just save a life, he ensured this bundle of joy came into this world."

Samaritans advice

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