The Leeds photographer who captured aftermath of 9/11 terror attacks

Yorkshire Evening Post photographer Bruce Rollinson was sent to New York to cover the aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks.

Saturday, 11th September 2021, 4:45 am

Bruce, who was working for the Yorkshire Post at the time, said he believes he was on one of the first flights into New York's LaGuardia Airport around three days after 9/11.

He recalled covering the harrowing story on the 20th anniversary of the September 11 2001 terror attacks, which claimed the lives of nearly 3,000 people.

Bruce, who spent 10 days in New York, said: "When we arrived it was night and so we went straight to the hotel.

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Bruce Rollinson's photograph of the skeletal remains of the World Trade Centre seen through dust and smoke at Ground Zero as seen from lower Broadway. September 19, 2001.

"The following morning we went to the scene. By that time a lot of it was cordoned off. It was just glimpses of wreckage"

Bruce said he can recall seeing white dust everywhere and the smell of burning.

"People were stunned," he said. "People were wearing masks and walking around in a haze.

"I remember going on the Staten Island ferry to get a view back into New York and Manhattan. The smoke was still rising from the site."

The view from the Staten Island ferry as it approaches Manhattan as smoke and dust still rise from the area the terrorist attack on the World Trade Centre. Picture taken by Bruce Rollinson on September 18, 2001.

Bruce said: "It made a lasting impression on me. It was the biggest story of the century."

Bruce Rollinson
Bruce Rollinson's photograph of the prayer wall at New York's Belle Vue Hospital on 1st Avenue and E29th dedicated to those missing after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Centre. Photo taken on September 18, 2001. Photo: Bruce Rollinson
A Commuter on the Staten Island ferry leaves Manhattan as smoke and dust rise from the area a week after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Centre in New York. Photo: Brice Rollinson