Notorious Leeds gangster Dennis Slade says he is ready to turn his back on life of crime

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A decade ago he was the leader of a group of inseperable hardcore criminal gang members.

A judge said Dennis Slade was the “instigator” and “architect” of daring robberies across the north of England with Richard Pearman and Michael Baxter dubbed as Slade’s “loyal henchmen and followers in crime.”

The Yorkshire Evening Post from when Dennis Slade was jailed

The Yorkshire Evening Post from when Dennis Slade was jailed

However after ten years in custody, those in authority have described how Slade is now motivated to live an offence-free life.

A Parole Board panel ruled that it was satisfied that Slade was suitable for release.
A summary document states:

“The panel listed risk factors associated with Mr Slade at the time of offending.

“These had included using power, control and manipulation to get what he wanted, unhelpful thinking, calculated risk taking, offending to get money, thinking it was acceptable to commit crime and spending time with people who thought the same, an ability and willingness to deceive people, and a willingness to use violence and weapons in order to get what he wanted.”

Evidence was presented at the hearing regarding completion of accredited programmes to address his offending behaviour.

Slade has taken part in courses designed to address “unhelpful thinking”, “understanding the effect of his actions upon victims”, and “the use of violence”.

The summary continues: “Witnesses described good behaviour in prison, achieving trusted positions through hard work, being motivated to live an offence-free life in the future, and that his risk factors and risk of future harm had been addressed through treatment programmes.

“All witnesses recommended Mr Slade’s release.

“The panel considered protective factors in this case to be a change in Mr Slade’s attitude and beliefs, good behaviour in prison, and having a job and somewhere to live available on release.”

Slade’s licence condition includes “extensive monitoring”, including wearing a device to track his location.

He must also live at a designated address approved by police and a probation officer.

At Pearman’s hearing in July 2017, a panel assessed risk factors associated with him which included “thrill-seeking, unhelpful attitudes, a poor choice of associates, drugs and alcohol and the use of violence to get what he wanted.”

Evidence was presented regarding his completion of programmes designed to address his offending.

The document states: “Witnesses described how he had done well since transferring to open prison in May 2017 and how he had progressed to spending temporary periods in the community and several periods of overnight release without concerns.

“Witnesses had some concerns about his attitude and bending the rules but did not consider that his risk of causing further serious harm was likely or imminent.”

His licence conditions include observing a curfew and to “comply with an enhanced form of supervision or monitoring.”

A Parole Board spokesperson said it was unable to provide a summary of the decision to approve Baxter’s release.

Read more: Dennis Slade released from prison