Boosting the Leeds’s art scene

ON DISPLAY: A work titled Delabole Slate Circle by artist Richard Long.
ON DISPLAY: A work titled Delabole Slate Circle by artist Richard Long.
0
Have your say

Two art galleries in Leeds will be hosting the city’s biggest collection of sculptures.

The Henry Moore Institute (HMI) and Leeds Art Gallery will be hosting the Leeds Sculpture Collection, which will span across both venues. It will feature over 200 different works, including tall sculptures, small models and works on paper.

The exhibition is currently considered to be the most important British sculpture collection outside of London and one of the strongest in Europe.

Godfrey Worsdale, director of the Henry Moore Foundation, said: “This is a special moment for sculpture in Leeds.

“To be able to share this as one exhibition across our two venues is extremely exciting.”

In addition, some of the works from the collection will also be featured at Temple Newsam House and Lotherton Hall, as both venues are part of the Leeds Museums and Galleries group.

The works in the collection will range from 1720 to the present day and the largest piece, Kiss, stands at 1.8m high. It will also feature a work crafted by a former researcher for the institute Anne Hardy called Falling and Walking.

After being closed for repairs, the collection is a fitting celebration for Leeds Art Gallery’s re-opening last year.

Sarah Brown, keeper of Leeds Art Gallery, said: “We’ve all been working towards this moment for some time now.

“We hope people who’ve never visited a gallery before will come and see what their city’s collection has to offer.

“It also gives young people the chance to see works that are critically acclaimed.”

The Leeds Sculpture Collection will open on March 22 and closes on September 2 at Leeds Art Gallery and the Henry Moore Institute.

Tim Wray, former executive chairman of Turner & Townsend

Former Turner & Townsend chairman Tim Wray dies aged 69