Here are the best and worst supermarket mince pies - from Asda to Lidl

Monday, 7th December 2020, 1:35 pm
Updated Monday, 14th December 2020, 9:27 am

Mince pies are a seasonal staple and they have already made their way onto supermarket shelves, giving shoppers plenty of variety.

If you’re feeling a bit spoiled for choice, here are our reviews of some of the best and worst mince pies on offer at supermarkets for Christmas 2020.

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M&S Collection Mince Pies - £2.50

Picture: M&S

Deep filled with vine fruits, cranberries, clementine and Cognac, the pies should have a wonderful zesty flavour, but the flavours are somewhat lost thanks to the alcohol.

The shortcrust pastry is wonderfully light and crumbly, but Cognac is the predominant flavour here, which can make the taste a little overwhelming. 2/5

Morrisons All Butter Deep Filled Mince Pies - £2

The mincemeat of these pies is incredibly sweet and despite being laced with spices, brand and cider, these flavours struggle to cut through.

As for the shortcrust pastry, while crumbly, it is quite thick which makes the pies taste quite heavy and dense. 2/5

Morrisons Black Forest Mince Pies - £2

Ideal if you’re keen to try something a bit different, this unique take on the classic mince pie comprises morello cherry mincemeat and a cherry and Kirsch filling, encased in a chocolate pastry case topped with a chocolate chip glittery crumble. 

The pies are wonderfully sweet and the chocolate pastry perfectly compliments the strong fruity flavour - perfect if you have a sweet tooth. 4.5/5

Lidl Deluxe All Butter Mince Pies - £1.49

These mince pies taste as buttery and crumbly as they look. The mincemeat is deliciously sweet, comprises notes of apple, orange and lemon peel, and is not overpowered by the Cognac, making it a good option for those who aren’t a fan of overly boozy pies.

The generous filling is encased in a delightfully light pastry and topped with a sweet dusting, and is incredibly moreish. 5/5

Tesco Finest All Butter Pastry Mince Pies - £1.75

Napoleon glace cherries, festive spices and citrus peel make up the mincemeat filling, which is infused with a subtle splash of Cognac, French brandy and port, and the pastry is both light and crumbly.

The alcohol isn’t too dominant, allowing the zesty flavours to come through, although the overall taste is quite sweet. 3.5/5

Asda Extra Special Luxury Mince Pies - £1.75

Picture: Asda

The shortcrust pastry is a little crisp on these pies, while the heavy dusting on the top makes the flavour extremely sweet - almost too sweet.

The filling is pleasant enough, with notes of orange and spices coming through, but the brandy and port does slightly overpower some of the ingredients. 2/5

Waitrose All Butter Mince Pies - £2.50

The pasty of these pies is so light that it almost melts in the mouth and has a wonderfully creamy taste, which is perfectly complemented by the rich mincemeat filling.

Made with apricots, glace cherries, almonds and brandy, the filling isn’t too dense and the citrus fruits manage to cut through the alcohol nicely. 4/5

Sainsbury’s Taste the Difference Mince Pies - £1.50

Picture: Sainsbury's

While these mince pies look deliciously tempting, the all butter pastry isn’t quite as melt in the mouth as it looks and has a rather crunchier texture than expected.

However, the flavour of the filling is fruity and rich and despite being brandy-infused, the alcohol flavouring isn’t too overpowering, allowing the citrus and spices to come through. 3/5

Iceland All Butter Mince Pies - £1.89

Sharp citrus flavours burst from this mince pie as soon as you bite into it, with lemon zest, orange peel and Yuzu juice among the ingredients.

The strong fruity notes are perfectly paired with the buttery, yet light shortcrust pastry, and the infusion of brandy, port and cider lends it a rich taste, without being too dominant.

This pie certainly stands out above the rest in terms of flavour. 5/5

A version of this article first appeared on our sister site, The Scotsman