Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice nurse runs 100th ultra marathon to raise almost £30,000

A  Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice nurse from Leeds  ran her 100th ultra marathon on New Year's Day to bring her fundraising total for the charity to almost £30,000.

By Grace Hammond
Monday, 3rd January 2022, 4:40 pm
Sarah Norman pictured after completing the gruelling Hardmoors 30 across North York Moors on Saturday January 1.
Sarah Norman pictured after completing the gruelling Hardmoors 30 across North York Moors on Saturday January 1.

Sarah Norman - a community clinical nurse Specialist in palliative Care at Wheatfields Hospice in Headingley - completed the gruelling Hardmoors 30 across North York Moors on Saturday.

Read More

Read More
Heart failure changed IT worker's life as he takes on 100 mile bike ride and mar...

It was 52-year-old Sarah's 100th ultramarathon and she has now clocked up a total of 5,049 ultra-marathon miles.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

Sarah Norman pictured taking part in the gruelling Hardmoors 30 across North York Moors on Saturday January 1.

Sarah, of Pudsey, has raised a total of £29,675 for the hospice during her 21-year carer with Sue Ryder.

She has run marathons, ultramarathons and even trekked up Mount Kilimanjaro to watch the sun rise on New Year’s Day in 2016.

Sarah is hoping to inspire others to take on a fundraising challenge of their own in 2022 for Sue Ryder.

“Sue Ryder is such a caring and inclusive organisation," Sarah said. "The best thing about doing my job is just how rewarding it is.

Sarah Norman pictured (front right) taking part in the gruelling Hardmoors 30 across North York Moors on Saturday January 1.

"It is such an honour to be there for people at what is such an important and emotional time in their lives.

“Most people think that the job is depressing and there are days when I am sad, but there are days when I see a patient we have helped make more comfortable and it makes it so worthwhile.”

During December Sarah ran 5km every single day to raise money as part of Sue Ryder’s December Daily Dash.

“In a way running and taking part in ultra-marathons helps me to keep doing my job," she said.

" Running is my way of clearing the mind. It gives me time to reflect and it is a huge source of stress release.

“We run in some pretty outstanding places too and the scenery is just amazing.

"There are times when I think ‘why on earth do I do this?’ but when you finish and look back on what you have achieved you feel such a high.

“I run alongside my husband, Andy, and he’s there every step of the way. When I am struggling he hands me jelly babies and then cooks pizza when we get home.

"We have so many friends that run too. It is great - a proper community.”

Sarah completed her first road marathon in 2002 and it was colleagues at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice who encouraged her to try off road running.

She said: “After I had done a few marathons the consultant at the hospice who did off road running encouraged me to have a go at trail running.

" I soon found I enjoyed running off road more than on it, and a group of hospice staff would meet up to go running before work.

"Before I knew it I had completed a few shorter races and then I was running races of 50 to 60 miles.

“Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice is such a fantastic environment to work in. We have such an amazing team who do all they can to give wonderful care and I see first-hand what a difference this care makes to families.”

For more information on the different ways you can support Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice in 2022 email [email protected] or call 0113 278 7249.

Support the YEP and become a subscriber today. Enjoy unlimited access to local news and the latest on Leeds United, With a digital subscription, you see fewer ads, enjoy faster load times, and get access to exclusive newsletters and content. Click here to subscribe.