Leeds nostalgia: Sporting memories of Leeds

Yorkshire Diary/From the YEP album....
With the demis and impending demolition of  Leeds International Pool our look through the album found this picture of the Turkish baths photographed in 1968.
Yorkshire Diary/From the YEP album.... With the demis and impending demolition of Leeds International Pool our look through the album found this picture of the Turkish baths photographed in 1968.
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The top picture shows was taken on April 15, 1950, the caption reads: ‘Armley Park Municipal Golf Course’

Of course, we know it today as Gott’s Park Golf Club and it is part of the Gott’s Park estate, which borders Armley Ridge Road. This particular view, however, with the now long demolished Kirkstall Power Station looming in the background, shows how much the area has altered.

Leeds, 15th April 1950
Leeds (Armley Park) Municipal Golf Course
with Kirkstall Power Station beyond.

Leeds, 15th April 1950 Leeds (Armley Park) Municipal Golf Course with Kirkstall Power Station beyond.

Benjamin Gott, a prominent businessman, rebuilt the house in 1812 but his family lived there until the early 1900s.

In the 1928 the building and grounds came under the ownership of the Wade’s charity. Wade’s Charity subsequently leased the Mansion and it’s grounds for 999 years to Leeds City Council. Part of the agreement was to see the grounds of the mansion remain a leisure space for the people of Leeds. Consequently on the 8th April 1933 Gotts Park Golf Club saw its first nine holes open to the public. Over the coming years it was developed into an 18 hole course.

Kirkstall Power Station opened in 1931 and was decommissioned in 1976 and torn down in the mid 1980s.

The second picture shows the Turkish baths of Leeds International Pool, photographed in 1968. It opened in 1966/7. It was built by John Poulson (1910-1993), a controversial figure who was later jailed for bribery.

The pool itself, which was plagued by faults and needed constant repairs.

It was often referred to as an Olympic size pool but in fact it was just a few inches too short (one of its other, sadly incurably, faults).

However, that didn’t mean it wasn’t popular - in its first six months, it attracted over 220,000 people.

It was finally closed to the public in 2009 and thereafter demolished.

Leeds nostalgia: November 1947: Country braced for three more years of rationing as Princess Elizabeth marries