Leeds nostalgia: Making tracks across Leeds - the Mallard in Leeds

Leeds.  14th April 1963''Mr. Denis Thompson takes a party for a trip on the miniature railway at Temple Newsam, Leeds. (A Yorkshire Post picture.)''On the grounds of Temple Newsam House, Leeds, is a train service Dr. Beeching will never get his hands on.  Yesterday was the first open day of the year for this miniature railway completed in 1960 after six years' work by members of the City of Leeds Society of Model and Experimental Engineers.''The 1,000ft. circular trarck is mounted on concrete support about 2ft. from the ground.  The round trip is completed in about 80 seconds.''Mr. Ronald Jeffrey, secretary to the Society, showed me his own pride and joy, Kathleen, a 5in. gauge locomotive weight 1.25cwt. which can pull 30cwt. (10 to 13 people).  he built it himselft at a cost of �30.''The engines are very economical to run.  "I bought 1cwt. of coal about three years ago and I'm still using it," he said.''Mr. A. Bott, a Society member from Barton-on-Humber, Lincs., had brought his model, a 1500 class Great Wes
Leeds. 14th April 1963''Mr. Denis Thompson takes a party for a trip on the miniature railway at Temple Newsam, Leeds. (A Yorkshire Post picture.)''On the grounds of Temple Newsam House, Leeds, is a train service Dr. Beeching will never get his hands on. Yesterday was the first open day of the year for this miniature railway completed in 1960 after six years' work by members of the City of Leeds Society of Model and Experimental Engineers.''The 1,000ft. circular trarck is mounted on concrete support about 2ft. from the ground. The round trip is completed in about 80 seconds.''Mr. Ronald Jeffrey, secretary to the Society, showed me his own pride and joy, Kathleen, a 5in. gauge locomotive weight 1.25cwt. which can pull 30cwt. (10 to 13 people). he built it himselft at a cost of �30.''The engines are very economical to run. "I bought 1cwt. of coal about three years ago and I'm still using it," he said.''Mr. A. Bott, a Society member from Barton-on-Humber, Lincs., had brought his model, a 1500 class Great Wes
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Two rail related pictures this week, the first (above), from April 1963 shows Denis Thompson taking a party for a trip on the miniature railway at Temple Newsam.

The railway was completed in 1960 after six years’ work by members of the City of Leeds Society of Model and Experimental Engineers

For possible use in the YP From the Archive series.''10th May 1988''THE MIGHTY Mallard, pride of Britain's railway history, puffed into Leeds Station today with a raging thirst.''It was pulling such a heavy load - 12 carriages carrying 250 top Post Office customers and stamp collectors - that it needed extra water supplies at Holbeck.''"The last thing we wanted was the boiler blowing up on Britain's pride and joy," said Mr Philip Round, Post Office Information Officer.''Mallard was making a special run across the Pennines from Manchester Victoria to mark two major anniversaries:

For possible use in the YP From the Archive series.''10th May 1988''THE MIGHTY Mallard, pride of Britain's railway history, puffed into Leeds Station today with a raging thirst.''It was pulling such a heavy load - 12 carriages carrying 250 top Post Office customers and stamp collectors - that it needed extra water supplies at Holbeck.''"The last thing we wanted was the boiler blowing up on Britain's pride and joy," said Mr Philip Round, Post Office Information Officer.''Mallard was making a special run across the Pennines from Manchester Victoria to mark two major anniversaries:

The 1,000ft circular track was mounted on concrete supports about 2ft from the ground.

The round trip was completed in about 80 seconds.

Ronald Jeffrey, secretary to the Society, drove Kathleen, a 5in gauge locomotive weight 1.25cwt, which pull 30cwt (10 to 13 people) and which he built himselft at a cost of £30.

He said the engine was very economical, adding: “I bought 1cwt of coal about three years ago and I’m still using it,

The Society had more than a dozen models and ran them regularly but they were only available to the public a few days in the year.

The second picture (below) is dated May 10, 1988 and shows the Mallard, pride of Britain’s railway history, puffing into Leeds Station.

It was pulling a heavy load - 12 carriages carrying 250 top Post Office customers and stamp collectors - it needed extra water at Holbeck.

“The last thing we wanted was the boiler blowing up,” said Mr Philip Round, Post Office Information Officer.

The Mallard was making a special run across the Pennines from Manchester Victoria to mark a major anniversary - it was 50 years since it broke the speed record by travelling at 126mph on July 3, 1938.

CORRECTION: Last week we said the skeleton of Mary Bateman, also known as the Leeds Witch (born 1768) was on display in the Thackray Medical Museum. In fact, the skeleton was removed from display last year.

Aerial pic of the site where Holbeck Hall once stood before slipping into the sea. See Ross Parry copy RPYSLIP : Large cracks have appeared on a seaside promenade close to where a hotel toppled into the sea over 20 years ago. A patch of land overlooking Scarborough's famous Spa conference centre has been fenced off and monitored by council workers in a bid to prevent parts of the Esplanade falling into the sea. A landslip in the North Yorkshire town in 1993 saw the historic wood-pannelled Holbeck Hall hotel tumble into the sea. Scarborough Borough Council has committed �1.87 million to protect land above the Spa in a bid to stablise the slopes behind the Spa as well as maintenance to the sea wall to stop "significant defects" and a plan to prevent "wave overtopping and landsliding".  It comes as part of an overall �14 million plan funded by the Environment Agency and North Yorkshire County Council.

Yorkshire nostalgia: Scarborough hotel destroyed by landslide in 1993