Leeds nostalgia: Leeds computer whiz derided for inventing Falklands War simulation in 1982

File photo dated 18/11/05 of a Nimrod, similar to the one that crashed, landing at RAF Kinloss. Senior military officers are expected to be criticised today in an official report into an RAF aircraft crash that killed 14 British servicemen in Afghanistan. PRESS ASSOCAITION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday October 28 2009. The Nimrod spy plane exploded in mid-air near Kandahar in 2006, causing the biggest single loss of life for UK forces since the Falklands War.  See PA story DEFENCE Nimrod. Photo credit should read: Danny Lawson/PA Wire
File photo dated 18/11/05 of a Nimrod, similar to the one that crashed, landing at RAF Kinloss. Senior military officers are expected to be criticised today in an official report into an RAF aircraft crash that killed 14 British servicemen in Afghanistan. PRESS ASSOCAITION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday October 28 2009. The Nimrod spy plane exploded in mid-air near Kandahar in 2006, causing the biggest single loss of life for UK forces since the Falklands War. See PA story DEFENCE Nimrod. Photo credit should read: Danny Lawson/PA Wire
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How times have changed. This month in 1982, savvy Leeds computer programmer Joseph Kirsch, 64, of Fir Tree Vale, Moortlown, was taking some flak after he designed a computer game based on the Falklands War.

He advertised the game for sale in a popular weekly computer magazine but he was forced to withdraw it after the magazine received a number of complaints about the game being in bad taste.

Mr Kirsch’s game was designed for the ZX81 and was described as being a bit like chess, with players able to take various battles from the Falklands War (fought only months earlier from April to June) and use ‘chess-like moves’ to play.

Mr Kirsch said: “I have not made a penny out of it and certainly did not intend it to cause any trouble. I devised it more as a hobby than anything else… I have now wiped the game off the cassette and should anybody place an order, the money will be returned.”

The story appeared in the YEP on Friday September 3. Given most computer war games are ultra-realistic recreations of historical battles, it would seem Mr Kirsch was more than a little ahead of his time.

Do you know Mr Kirsch or are you related to him? If so, please get in touch with neil.hudson@ypn.co.uk

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