Leeds nostalgia: June 19, 1917: A week from today, American troops landed in Europe

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Female suffrage was in the news 100 years ago today, as 407 members of the House of Commons voted to give women the vote.

One commentator pointed out that because of the war, women had “been swept into every sort of work done or once done by men”, adding: “there is a certain common sense and sense of justice in human nature... that women ought not in logic to be ordered in one breath to come out and help us and then in another breath to go back and stop helping us any more.”

FILE--U.S. troops of Zero Hour Company go over the top during trench warfare at an unknown battlefield in Europe during World War I.  The first world war was triggered June 28, 1914 when Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were assassinated in Sarajevo, Bosnia,setting off a chain of events that would lead the United States to declared war on April 6, 1917 to make the world "safe for democracy." More than nine million people died, many of them in the trenches, before Armistice Day, Nov. 11,1918.(AP Photo)

FILE--U.S. troops of Zero Hour Company go over the top during trench warfare at an unknown battlefield in Europe during World War I. The first world war was triggered June 28, 1914 when Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were assassinated in Sarajevo, Bosnia,setting off a chain of events that would lead the United States to declared war on April 6, 1917 to make the world "safe for democracy." More than nine million people died, many of them in the trenches, before Armistice Day, Nov. 11,1918.(AP Photo)

In other news, the Allies suffered heavy losses following a German attack near Monchy. This was offset somewhat by the fact Italy (which fought against Germany during the conflict) captured 938 prisoners during a raid.

The Germans took territory from the British near Infantry Hill but, said the report, this was quickly recaptured within a few days.

Meanwhile, Germany was relying more and more on its U-boats.

Some months earlier, the British intercepted and decoded a telegram - the Zummerman Telegram - from the German Foreign Secretary Arthur Zimmermann to Mexico urging her entry into war against the United States. The American states of Texas, Arizona and New Mexico were to be offered to the Mexican government in return for such assistance. German U-boats continued unrestricted warfare

Although the US joined the war against Germany on April 6, it was not until June 26, a week today in 1917, that the first troops landed in Europe, which marked the beginning of the end of the conflict.

The US did not want to enter the war but was forced to by Germany’s unrestricted U-boat warfare.

It also marked the beginning, in many respects, of a new world era, one of American interventionism.

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