Leeds nostalgia: Fears Y2K bug will crash computers... but what about ‘Year 2038 Bug’?

Representitives from the new Millennium Bug Co-ordination Unit, Phil Chapman, left, Jeremy Walker at it's launch today, Tuesday.
Representitives from the new Millennium Bug Co-ordination Unit, Phil Chapman, left, Jeremy Walker at it's launch today, Tuesday.
0
Have your say

News anchor and TV presented Peter Snow called it ‘a wheeze’, quipping: “Invent a problem that doesn’t exist, then charge a fortune to get rid of it.”

He was talking, of course, about the dreaded Millennium Bug, also known as the Y2K virus, which was set to wreak havoc with computer systems everywhere as the world moved from one millennium to another.

The story appeared in the YEP in January 2000 - for more nostaligia, click HERE.

Conservative estimates put spending on preventative measures at $400bn, while some reckon it hit $1trillion.

Mr Snow added in jest: “I do so wish I had been the dreamer upper of the Millennium Bug.”

The ‘bug’ came about because of the practice of abbreviating four digit year dates to two digits. So, 1980 would simply be recorded as 80. This meant that computers would be unable to recognise the difference between 1900 and 2000.

Computer experts said this embedded logic would lead to all kinds of problems with recording important information. In the end, it turned out to be a damp squib.

However, Y2K is nothing compared to the ‘Year 2038 Problem’, which threatens to reset our technological systems because of a glitch with binary code... apparently.

Maria Harrison with her quads, Alisha, back left and Anoushka, back right, Amelia, front left and Ashley at their home in Filey

Leeds nostalgia: Yorkshire mum has twins 17 months apart

File photo dated 09/11/2004 of a T-Mobile Phone. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo.  Issue Date: Tuesday December 18, 2007. Two of Britain's biggest mobile phone operators today announced a deal to share their "third generation" mast network.  T-Mobile and 3 said the move paved the way for complete coverage across Britain for 3G services by the end of next year.  It is also expected to save an estimated �2 billion over 10 years, the pair added, and lead to a reduction of 5,000 mobile phone masts across the UK. See PA story CITY Mobile. Photo credit should read: PA Wire

Leeds nostalgia: ‘Radiation’ fears over mobile phone spread among children