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Cabbage and Trampolene unite for Sheffield gig to help Musicians Against Homelessness campaign

Cabbage headline the fundraising gig at The Leadmill.
Cabbage headline the fundraising gig at The Leadmill.
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OASIS guru Alan McGee is teaming up with bands in the Sheffield area as part of the Musicians Against Homelessness #MAH2017 campaign to raise money for the homeless charity Crisis.

Former Oasis guru Alan McGee launched the campaign in 2016.

Alan McGee, Oasis guru, is supporting Musicians Against Homelessness.

Alan McGee, Oasis guru, is supporting Musicians Against Homelessness.

It was publicly supported by celebrities such as Lilly Allen, Liam Gallagher and Irvine Welsh and more than 500 bands played over one hundred MAH benefit gigs around the UK.

Hundreds of bands and artists have again got behind this year’s drive which coincides with the 50th anniversary of Crisis.

Northern Exposure webzine have stepped up to back the cause this year and will host two big Sheffield events with all proceeds going to the charity. Rachel Brown from Northern Exposure explains why she chose to get involved with MAH this year: Northern Exposure is an outlet dedicated to promoting new music, especially in our city of Sheffield. Musicians Against Homelessness is a massive platform for musicians to showcase their talents while importantly raising money for homeless people. This is a national crisis close to our hearts. We wanted to get involved again this year to help grow and support the project, and to help people on the streets throughout winter and beyond.

On November 10 Manchester band Cabbage who are currently selling out venues on their UK tour will headline a MAH benefit gig at The Leadmill. Also on the bill are the hotly tipped band Trampolene who’ve just been announced as support for Liam Gallagher, local band Sheafs and from London Sisteray. Tickets are just £10 from https://www.seetickets.com/tour/northern-exposure-presents-mah

Cabbage singer Lee Broadbent said: “Homelessness is the most visible invisible crime, as in we all choose to ignore it and yet it’s in every city and every town, it’s embarrassing for a first world country.”

Jack Jones from Trampolene said: “I’ve been homeless myself for a short while, but was lucky enough to have a van to live in and friends floors to sleep on. I can’t begin to imagine what its like to be homeless with no hope of getting a home, feeling hungry, unwanted and having cold weather just around the corner. I find it very hard to understand how anyone should be homeless in the UK in 2017, as it is a problem that surely can be solved.”

On December 7 Cafe Totem (formally the Rocking Chair) host the 2nd gig in the city with local band The Time Sellers, Lucie Barrat (Carl Barrat’s sister) , The Kavaliers from Doncaster and Stray Scene from Scarborough.

Tickets are just £5 from https://www.seetickets.com/event/northern-exposure-presents-mah-2/caf-totem-sheffield/1154398

Alan McGee said: “I am delighted that bands of this calibre want to be part of this campaign.

“The support in Sheffield has been tremendous and inspiring and it’s fantastic that so many quality bands have come forward.

“Although our primary concern is to combat the scourge of homelessness it is vital that the MAH gigs also give up-and-coming combos a chance to play to larger audiences.”

McGee added: “Last year the response was incredible but more people know about us now.

“We are getting people talking and taking action on homelessness in the best way we know how, through music and community.

“This problem will not go away. Statistics show a significant rise in the people sleeping rough on British streets – 4,134 in January in England alone – which is an absolute disgrace.”

Happy Mondays and Black Grape star Shaun Ryder who’s supported the project since said: “To see so many people in this day and age homeless and hungry is unbelievable. This is not Victorian Britain!

“As usual it’s the people who are not in a position to speak for themselves or be heard who get left behind and ignored.

“It’s become so common to see homeless people on the streets that maybe it’s not a shock when you walk past. Or maybe it’s so shocking that you have to look away, and try not to think about it?”

Ryder, preparing to tour with the Happy Mondays, went on: “The sad thing is, it’s not the public’s problem, but they’re the ones most likely to actually help the homeless than anyone in government.

“I’ve been through some difficult times in my life, but fortunately I’ve always had a roof over my head.

“If I found myself in a desperate and vulnerable position where I’d have to trust the decisions being made in Parliament, I’d be seriously worried.”

John Power, lead singer with Cast, is also supporting the campaign. He said: “It’s great to be asked to be involved with the Musicians Against Homelessness campaign again.

“With so many ongoing problems in the world today it’s sometimes easy to forget the ones in which you come face to face with everyday in the towns and cities up and down the UK.”

Power, currently on tour promoting Cast’s new album Kicking Up The Dust, added: “Homelessness is a massive problem and one we can’t just step over and ignore.

“Let’s help bring awareness to the ever increasing problem of homelessness on our streets today.”

Jon Sparkes, Chief Executive of Crisis, said: “I’m delighted that Musicians Against Homelessness will be supporting Crisis again this year with what promises to be an even bigger and better programme of gigs and events in the autumn.

“Homelessness remains an unsolved problem across the UK, so your help and support in what will be our 50th year, is much needed, and greatly appreciated.”

Alan McGee famously managed Oasis and currently manages The Jesus & Mary Chain , Black Grape, Happy Mondays and Cast, among others. The maverick businessman believes the MAH campaign also gives new bands a platform, in the way that Rock Against Racism did in the 1970s.

He said: “Music brings us together regardless of politics or social standing. It’s a great leveller and a vital tool for change.”

He went on: “The Homelessness Reduction Bill is a step in the right direction. But without the necessary funding to enable local councils to prevent homelessness it will be ineffective.”