Patrick Bamford's good day, Liam Cooper's bad day, Victor Orta's tirade and off camera moments from Leeds United's Brentford draw

Leeds United held Brentford to a dramatic 2-2 draw at Elland Road in the Premier League on Sunday, but who of a Whites persuasion had a day to remember or a day to forget?

Monday, 6th December 2021, 1:03 pm

Number of the day

3

Leeds have now scored three goals in the 90th minute or beyond this season. Even when frustration set in they kept at it and kept believing. It's a mark of this team that they go right to the end, although Marcelo Bielsa would appreciate results being sewn up a lot earlier. There are no signs of burnout here.

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Leeds United's Patrick Bamford steps off the bench at Elland Road. Pic: Getty

Turning point

Brentford's first

Whether it was the goal or the departure of Phillips or a combination of both, the 54th minute of the game felt like the moment that Leeds lost control of this game. From then until the final 15 minutes they were in control and looking comfortable, having looked so ordinary beforehand.

Good day

Tyler Roberts

Everyone was talking about the return of Patrick Bamford to play up front, so what better time than to score your first goal of the season? It was a lovely moment for a 22-year-old who has been scapegoated to a degree during the current campaign. He needs more moments like this, many more, but this was one to savour. His first half performance was good, too.

Patrick Bamford

Cometh the 11th hour, cometh the man. Bamford's return lifted Elland Road, even as he warmed up on the sideline. He couldn't get into the game at all but was right where he needed to be to score a hugely important goal. It was his second late equaliser of the season and the celebrations held all of the frustration he's felt at missing out since mid-September.

Bad day

Liam Cooper

The fall was awkward and the injury didn't look good at all. Just as Leeds' injury problems are clearing up, the last thing they or their skipper needed was for him to be limping out of an important game so early, ahead of four games against 'big six' sides. The hope is that Pascal Struijk can be fit for Chelsea.

Kalvin Phillips

He played with an edge and was clearly unamused with referee David Coote, but annoyance turned to dismay as he limped off with an injury. The next four games are ones he will be relishing so a knock, no matter the severity, is woefully timed for all concerned at Elland Road.

Victor Orta

His joy at Bamford's goal will no doubt have been a sight to behold, but the scenes at full-time, captured on camera, as he remonstrated vehemently with persons unknown in the West Stand, were not a great look. CEO Angus Kinnear made an attempt to restrain the director of football but the red mist had descended.

Off-camera moments

Daniel James delighted a group of youngsters behind the goal at the Don Revie end of the ground as he came out to look at the pitch before the game, making his way to them for a natter.

Illan Meslier enjoyed a pre-game catch up too, with former FC Lorient team-mate Yoane Wissa of Brentford. The pair played together at Stade du Moustoir before making their respective moves to the Premier League and both represent a feather in the cap of Les Merlus.

Mateusz Klich appeared to see the funny side when Bielsa chopped and changed the plan to replace Cooper, but what really tickled the Polish international was the sight of former team-mate Pontus Jansson getting irate at referee David Coote in the first half.

Coote came in for some stick from both sides due to his first half officiating. It was Kalvin Phillips representing Leeds and the midfielder had been visibly upset by the referee for a significant spell in the first half.

When the teams emerged for the second half Raphinha, in his own inimitable, animated way, was requesting gloves and possibly tape. The gloves were forthcoming but he simply carried them for around 30 seconds as he tried to join an attack, then flung them back in the direction of the technical area.

At full-time the Brazilian engaged in a stare down of the match officials as they left the field. He stood, hands on hips, in the centre circle with a face like thunder, his glare following their movements.

Patrick Bamford was busy lapping up the applause of the fans and, having been approached by a pitch invader who escaped the attentions of the stewards, kindly removed his shirt to give the supporter the gift he was seeking. A stadium suspension might follow but he got what he came for.

Long after the ground had emptied of supporters Bielsa emerged for his final round of media duties, pitchside. On completion he turned to deliver a wave to the groundsmen hard at work on the pitch, took a selfie with a waiting youngster in the West Stand and then embraced a pair of children belonging to one of his staff. The boys walked Bielsa back to the tunnel and had their hair ruffled with an intensity befitting the man.