YEP Letters November 8

Picture by Gerard Binks Photography
Picture by Gerard Binks Photography
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Have your say

Check out today’s YEP letters

Fireworks are brilliant in right hands

Andrew Mitchell, Leeds.

IF the local MPs had the backing of the millions of people to whom late night fireworks and non-organised fireworks are a complete anathema, we might just get this nonsense finished.

Fireworks are brilliant...in the right hands.

Trouble is drunken people just setting “one more off” aren’t the right hands.

Just ask the RSPCA, the elderly, hospitals in the vicinity of night long fireworks.

Please contact your local MP now.

Airport is an embarrassment to great city

Phil Brown, Harrogate.

AM I only one that thinks Leeds Bradford Airport is not fit for purpose and is an embarrassment to the great city of Leeds? On a recent trip to and from Limoges with Ryanair, the following incidents occurred:

As I arrived at 4.45am (yes 4.45) for a 6.15am flight, the security queues were back to the Jet2 desks and it took 60 minutes to get through, even with a boarding pass and no luggage. In security, three of the entry points were closed due to ‘‘staff shortages’’.

On my return, we were held on the plane for 30 minutes due to, in their own words, ‘‘lots of planes landing at the same time’’ and the buses were busy.

Passport control queues were back to the apron entrance and two of the desks were unmanned.

The ‘‘security gates’’ that lead from luggage retrieval to the outside world were faulty and would not allow anyone to leave, clearly causing a fire hazard. Upon arrival at the parking exit, I was denied exit because I was late.

I use LBA on a regular basis for both business and pleasure and at least one of the above happens every time.

LBA is ‘just one big rip-off’

Dave Bell, Hull.

I RECENTLY took a party of 10 pensioners to Leeds Bradford Airport.

I arrived at 12.37pm and left at 12.47pm, a time of 10 minutes for a fee of £8. I then went back to the airport at 2.11pm and leaving at 2.18pm, a time of five minutes for a fee of £8.

I know there is a car park free for an hour nearby but I don’t expect 10 old people to walk with cases in the rain to the terminal. It’s just one big rip-off. If Leeds was the last airport on this planet, I would never use it.

‘Sad reminder of former glory’

Brian Johnston, Burmantofts

What is the matter with this city of Leeds, many of us keep asking ourselves... always playing catch up with its nearest rival... no transport system worth calling... the gridlock capital of the north.

Let’s take the tragedy of Kirkgate Market, once the jewel in the crown but now a sad reminder of its former glory. Any other town would be proud of such an asset, but not, so it seems, Leeds City Council.

Once, with a variety of merchandise on offer, but now mostly nail bars, mobile phone outlets and fast food takeaways. To the casual visitor, there is a ‘death wish’ about the place, especially when presented with the vast empty wasteland at the east end, used only once a week for ‘fars’ valuable retail space abandoned.

However, there is a pie in the sky scheme floated, to attract ‘students’... yes, students – entailing traders to platform their services online, signage in different languages, open until late and invitation to purchase by card.

Are they serious?

Morale is at an all-time low, with yet another important outlet, Crawshaws butchers collapsing.

A market is a ‘market’ first and last, and not some sort of forum for ‘experiences’ or ‘events’ all ‘free’ (there are plenty of those in Briggate).

Too little too late for centre?

Mrs CA Gannon, Barwick in Elmet

I read with interest that the shopping centre at Crossgates is to receive some investment at long last. I wonder if this is too little too late?

It has been losing customers for some time, particularly with the closure of Tesco at its very heart. Walking through the centre on November 1 I counted four empty shop units – not a good look for a small shopping area. Additionally, there are empty units on the outside such as Marks & Spencer’s food hall and Barclays Bank which closed only recently.

Friends tell me they don’t come to Crossgates any more mainly due to the closure of Tesco plus the cost of parking. The regular comment I hear is “you can’t do a proper shop in Crossgates any more – it’s all frozen food and coffee shops”. Almost everyone’s opinion seems to be that the centre isn’t what it used to be and, sadly, if the shops people want are not there, then a part refurbishment will not entice them back.

Back charity Ribbon Appeal

Tom Nutt, Chief Executive, Meningitis Now.

Meningitis Now has today launched its 2018 Ribbon Appeal, which gives everyone an opportunity to remember loved ones this Christmas – and we’d like to invite your readers to dedicate their own ribbon.

Each year the charity helps people to honour those they have lost with a ribbon inscribed with their family member or friend’s name.

These are placed on our Tree of Remembrance at our Christmas Concert in Gloucester Cathedral on December 13.

To dedicate a ribbon visit our website at www.MeningitisNow.org/ribbon2018 before 7 December. Ribbons can be placed by anyone left bereaved, whatever the circumstances of their loss, and all donations received in exchange for a ribbon will help Meningitis Now support families who need us this Christmas and throughout the coming months and years.

It’s only through the generosity of individuals that we’re able to save lives and rebuild futures, through our research, awareness and support work, and your donation really does make a difference. This year’s appeal is spearheaded by Russ and Kerry Fisher, of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, who lost their daughter Rubie to bacterial meningitis at just six weeks old in 2015.

We have been supporting the family since then. Russ and Kerry have bravely allowed us to film their story to help with our appeal and you can view this at www.meningitisnow.org/rubie

If anyone would like to know more about our Ribbon Appeal, or get tickets for our concert, please visit our website.