YEP Letters: August 9

England manager Gareth Southgate walks back out onto the pitch after the FIFA World Cup, Semi Final match at the Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 11, 2018. See PA story WORLDCUP Croatia. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No use with any unofficial 3rd party logos. No manipulation of images. No video emulation.
England manager Gareth Southgate walks back out onto the pitch after the FIFA World Cup, Semi Final match at the Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 11, 2018. See PA story WORLDCUP Croatia. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No use with any unofficial 3rd party logos. No manipulation of images. No video emulation.
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Check out today’s YEP letters

‘England were less than impressive’

Terry Watson, Adel

Gareth Southgate is in the running for Best FIFA Men’s Coach for 2018. He picked a good squad and they did well getting into the semi-final, but they were less than impressive.

I thought the standard was poor this year with the big names Brazil, Spain, Portugal, Germany, and Italy all disappointing. England were very boring to watch as far as football is concerned. The passing for passing’s sake is boring and achieved nothing in the last World Cup. I saw two players pass the ball three times between them and then back to the keeper who then kicked upfield and possession was lost and this happened so many times.

What happened to dribbling and beating an opponent and making space to create goals? Too often the wingers just cross the ball into the penalty area and hope for the best. The passing game is played at walking pace and is negative and boring to watch. My advice to all managers is to watch some George Best and Dennis Law films and see how football should be played.

Concerns for new petrol station plan

Coun Tom Leadley, West Ardsley

Re the proposed petrol filling station and drive-through coffee shop at the former White Bear, Tingley,.

Since 2010 I have followed the many twists and turns of redevelopment at the White Bear next to Tingley roundabout, made many written comments on the various McDonald’s restaurant schemes, and was Morley Town Council’s planning witness at the public inquiry in 2016 into the refusal of their fourth application.

Dismissal of that appeal, after a four-day hearing, prompted McDonald’s to withdraw their fifth and final application, and bring their project to an end.

We now have a proposal for a petrol filling station and drive-through coffee shop at White Bear, which raises some of the same concerns as the drive-through restaurant, such as disturbance of neighbours by vehicle movements for many hours seven days a week.

The petrol station and shop would be open from 6am to 11pm most days, slightly less on Saturdays and bank holidays, and the coffee shop from 7am to 10pm every day.

More than half the trees would have to go, even though they are protected by a Tree Preservation Order.

One important thing which has come to light ist that Yorkshire Water, in a letter of July 16, has said that the current plans show buildings over the lines of a main sewer and water-main; the cost of diverting them would be prohibitive.

At the least this must prompt a major revision of the site layout; it may well be that it will bring an end to the scheme.

Development of some kind is needed at White Bear; my preference, as it has been for some time, would be to build a crescent of about half a dozen houses facing onto the Old Dewsbury Road turning-head; they would be sheltered by acoustic fences from noise from the roundabout, which lies to the north, so the fences could be put up without blocking much light from back gardens.

Search for bike’s history

Nicholas A Preston, by email

I have a Rodgers bike that I am part way through rebuilding but my search for the history of it is not yielding much.

Rodgers was at the time a renowned bike builder and I understand that Mr Briggs from Ellis Briggs served as a sales assistant there before setting up with Mr Ellis in Shipley.

The shop in Leeds I know is still there as a fishing tackle shop but what happened to the bike business I would like to find out.

My mother’s family were all from the Ilkley, Shipley, Bradford area as I collected and restore old racing bikes felt there needed to be one from this area in the collection.

The work is part done, I live between Shanghai and Italy these days so only get chance to work on my bikes when in Italy but I hope to 
see it in good working order before the end of September and once again a part of Leeds history will be back on the road.

Any help you can offer in looking into JT Rodgers would be fantastic and very welcomed.

Nationalism means you are patriotic

Derrick Bond, Shadwell

I was surprised at Lord Mandelson’s remarks about Brexit supporters being nationalists, and at his definition of nationalism as a hatred of foreigners and foreign countries.

From which dictionary did he take his definition? Nationalism means you are extremely patriotic, showing allegiance and loyalty to your country.

Is it a bad thing that we want to be an independent nation, free of domination by Brussels. With his pension as a former European Commissioner and all the perks that go with it, Lord Mandelson can’t be seen to criticise the Brussels gravy train.

A positive future for polio?

David Mitchell, National Chairman, The British Polio Fellowship

The British Polio Fellowship marks 80 years in six months’ time and seeing an end to polio worldwide has been the ardent wish of those of us involved in the battle to beat polio; so it’s incredible to now see the deadly polio virus being used to combat cancer.

If some good could come out of an ancient horror that has left countless dead and millions paralysed, that would be truly remarkable.

In trials on brain cancer, 21 percent receiving experimental polio therapy survived three years or more, compared to four percent on chemotherapy. Using a virus that left the world paralysed by fear to defeat one of the biggest killers in the modern world seems apt.

Allowing polio to reproduce in cancerous cells and destroy them is a masterstroke and the hope is treatment could be repeated with few ill effects in a way chemotherapy cannot.

Skin and breast cancers will be easier to treat and are set to form part of new trials. Hope out of helplessness would be an unexpected legacy for a disease that has left 120,000 of us in the UK living with Post Polio Syndrome (PPS) a neurological condition with no cure.

Polio survivors needing our support can call us on 0800 043 1935 or visit www.britishpolio.org.uk

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