#YEP125: Old ads that provide a rush of nostalgia

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As the Yorkshire Evening Post prepares to mark its 125th birthday next week, Paul Robinson looks at the paper’s advertising from yesteryear.

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THEY are snapshots of a more innocent time, far removed from the big budget and occasionally bombastic advertising of today.

Hand-drawn images and no-nonsense captions espouse good sense and style to try to persuade people that here are offers not to be missed.

But although the products being promoted vary wildly, from men’s cologne and cigarettes to mink coats and cars, these ads have one special thing in common – they have all appeared in the pages of the Yorkshire Evening Post over the years.

They have been pulled from our archives, dusted off and reprinted as part of the build-up to the paper’s 125th birthday next week.

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Names such as Arnold G Wilson and Schofields are among those sure to provide a rush of nostalgia for older readers. The Schofields department store advert dates from 1951 and features a 
women’s “large size coat” with “patch pockets and turn-back cuffs” that is “suitable for 46 or 48in hips”.

A 1967 ad for Bond Street’s Marshall & Snelgrove store, meanwhile, trumpets: “Our largest fur buy ever – £100,000! Choose superb brand new mink – we have cleared the rails of a top Canadian furrier.” Would-be purchasers are also assured: “All furs will 
be embroidered with your own personal monogram.”

One eye-opening advertisement from 1965 carries a 
picture of a packet of Capstan cigarettes among assorted fresh food and vegetables with the tagline: “Capstan reflects the trend to a natural taste.”

There is also an example of celebrity endorsement, with film star David Niven giving 
his seal of approval to the 
Remington electric shaver in 1951. In the advert, he tells readers: “Believe me, for a ‘Happy go lovely’ shave, you can’t beat a Remington. Ask your dealer to show you the latest models.”

The YEP was first published on September 1, 1890, with a promise to bring its readers “news of all kinds”.

� Charlotte Graham 
Picture Taken 06/10/2017. 
Picture Shows
Early Morning Light on Harold Park with Swans in the foreground

The park is named after Harold Gathorn Hardy who died in 1881 at the age of 32. Harold helped establish the family run Low Moor Ironworks.In 1899 a recreation ground was added to the park, while in the early 20th century Low Moor Gala was held raising money for local hospitals. In 1931 Horsfall playing fields were added to the park, in 2014 these became a Queen Elizabeth II Playing fields and also contains Horsfall Stadium.

Harold Park is a small urban park in Low Moor, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. The park is open all day all year round. To the immediate north of Harold Park is Horsfall Stadium home to Bradford Park Avenue A.F.C. and Albion Sports A.F.C. Park Dam is a short walking distance to the south.

The park has been given a Green Flag Award and the Platinum award from The Royal Horticultural Society Yorkshire in Bloom for open spaces.

‘12 Days of Christmas’: Seven Swans-a-swimming