YEP Says, June 25: Bright future for monuments of ‘old’ Leeds

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The planned restoration of buildings like Temple Mill in Leeds, is testament to the reinvention of those magnificent structures that powered the Industrial Revolution.

The planned restoration of buildings like Temple Mill in Leeds, is testament to the reinvention of those magnificent structures that powered the Industrial Revolution.

The Grade I Victorian listed building - one of the most unusual and instantly recognisable textile mills in Yorkshire - is a former flax mill that made history as “the largest room in the world”, with sheep grazing on a skylit roof in the heart of Leeds’s industrial revolution.

Now it has become the focus of an exciting proposal between developers, Historic England and Leeds City Council that would see it becoming a leading cultural venue at the heart of a residential and commercial development.

Like Salts Mill in Saltaire and Dean Clough Mills in Halifax, 21st century innovators are breathing new life into Yorkshire’s not-so dark, satanic former mills which remain so emblematic of the region’s landscape.

By leading by example, these ventures give added impetus to Historic England’s newly-commissioned study into the future of redundant textile mills – and what more can be done to convert these landmark sites into thriving business ventures with the potential to create a new generation of jobs in areas that have been traditionally home to above-average unemployment.

In this respect, the past still holds the key to the future.

Thieves stealing our heritage

Ask people what they’re most worried about, and it’s never going to be top of their list. Stone theft, it’s a victimless crime, isn’t it?

Maybe that’s what goes through the mind of the idiots who think it’s ok to rip up pieces of Yorkshire’s heritage. There were 736 incidents of stone theft recorded in the past year. Homes, schools, farms and churches have allbeen victims of thieves who are often stealing to order.

We can all play a part in stopping this crime in its tracks. As West Yorkshire Police’s Chris Joyce points out in our story today, the market for stolen goods plummets if people don’t look the other way.

PIC: Simon Hulme

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