YEP Says, July 22: Pillars of policing Leeds couldn’t do without

0
Have your say

HOW times change. Derided for so long, it is a measure of the importance – and effectiveness – of police community support officers that they will actually be missed if funding pressures lead to the abolition of such posts in Leeds and, potentially, other cities across the region.

HOW times change. Derided for so long, it is a measure of the importance – and effectiveness – of police community support officers that they will actually be missed if funding pressures lead to the abolition of such posts in Leeds and, potentially, other cities across the region.

They’re no longer “hobby bobbies” – the unflattering term that was coined to describe PCSOs when they were introduced during David Blunkett’s stint as Home Secretary more than a decade ago. These are pillars of policing whose work is now integral to West Yorkshire Police’s fight against crime. Not only do they provide a reassuring presence on the streets, and enable the police to forge better links with local communities, but they also enable other officers to devote more time to confront those challenges, like historic abuse allegations or internet fraud, which are having such a dramatic impact on day-to-day policing.

Though most people would like to see even more regular patrols in their neighbourhood, and by fully fledged officers, the fact of the matter is that cyber crime has overtaken street muggings as the biggest threat to an individual’s security. Given how PCSOs enable both objectives to be met, it can only be hoped that West Yorkshire Police and the councils on its patch find a way to continue a service which has now become invaluable to so many communities.

Be a hero - just like Geoffrey Boycott

HE might be as irascible as ever when it comes to cricketing matters, and with good reason after England’s recent capitulation against Australia, but Geoffrey Boycott’s brave fight against cancer, and other illnesses, has revealed a softer side to this iconic Yorkshireman. It is borne out by a generosity of spirit that has been the making of this single-minded sportsman who would not allow anything – or anyone – to stand in the way of his cricket career.

This is illustrated by Mr Boycott deciding to head up the Be A Hero campaign which is seeking to persuade to become more people to become organ donors. His logic, just like his acclaimed punditry on Test Match Special, is delivered with a straight bat. As he owes 
his life to the brilliance of the National Health Service’s cancer doctors, and his 
own personal willpower, why should he not use 
his considerable influence so that more people can have the chance to receive the gift of a life through transplant surgery? It is 
a profound point.

PIC: Simon Hulme

YEP Says: Dust ourselves down Leeds and become a cultural success