YEP Says: Why we should all consider being an organ donor

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WE KNOW only too well from recent tragedies how organ transplants can be such a force for good.

They allow people, shocked by the sudden loss of a loved one, to offer new hope to people in need of organ donation.

Often, more than one person can benefit from the shocking loss of someone in the prime of their life.

It means that families who have suffered a bereavement can at least recognise that some good has come of their loss which allow them to come to terms with their own tragedy.

But too many people, it seems, register for organ donation. They are often young and healthy.

They don’t expect to die and organ donation is the furthest thing from their mind.
It is important to recognise that there are almost 2,000 people in West Yorkshire who are alive today because of organ donation. Across the country this figure is 50,000.

Let’s hope this organ donation campaign can reach more people and persuade them to agree to donate their organs to others, should the unthinkable happen.

Maybe this doesn’t go far enough. Perhaps, rather than an opt-in system, we need an opt-out scheme? Perhaps people should be deemed to be prepared to donate their organs unless they expressly say otherwise? What do you think?

Tony Yeboah scores in the 1995 Christmas Eve clash between Leeds and Manchester United.

Rob Atkinson: A very Leeds United Christmas Eve