YEP Says: Why community events really do make a difference

A badge worn by sister Kim Leadbeater of murdered MP Jo Cox, as she attends a Great Get Together event  marking the anniversary of Mrs Cox's death, at The Green in Heckmondwike. PIC: PA
A badge worn by sister Kim Leadbeater of murdered MP Jo Cox, as she attends a Great Get Together event marking the anniversary of Mrs Cox's death, at The Green in Heckmondwike. PIC: PA
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AS JO Cox famously said, we have more in common with each other than which divides us. That could have been the motto for the Chapeltown Carinival which has spent 50 years bringing the community of Leeds together in style.

It was, of course, created as a Caribbean festival for people who missed the colour and beat of their homeland.

This popular festival is now one of the biggest in the country, second only to Notting Hill, and is a spectacle which appeals to people of all backgrounds bring people together for a joyous and colourful celebration of culture.

It was one of the great unifying features of a this part of the city, which was scarred by the Chapeltown riots of 30 years ago.

Chapeltown did not let itself be defined by that event, rather what followed were efforts to create better understanding of why, hard work to forge good community relationships and greater trust

More recently the community Iftar organised by Leeds youngsters One Foundation helped feed the homeless and bring people together who might not normally meet. It culminated in a spontaneous game of street football - smiles all round. What big events like the carnival or smaller ones like the Iftar, alongside national ones like the Great Get Together, show is that such efforts are hugely worthwhile and really do make a difference.

A police force has warned members of the public not call to them to report people throwing snowballs

Police force tells public not to call them to report people throwing snowballs