Seven lost wonders.

The seven lost wonders of Leeds

Leeds is home to some remarkable buildings but over the years many of the most impressive have been demolished.

Here we look at seven lost wonders of the city. READ MORE: Nine best kept secrets in Leeds even some locals won't know about

Originally the home of the Stanhope family, Horsforth Hall was built in 1699. It was a grandiose house and as such was meant to be a statement of wealth.

5. Horsforth Hall, Horsforth (1699-1950s)

Originally the home of the Stanhope family, Horsforth Hall was built in 1699. It was a grandiose house and as such was meant to be a statement of wealth.
Horsforth Civic Society
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When it was built, it was the largest Methodist chapel in existence. When the church organ was installed in 1827, it was described as 'the organ which cost 1,000 and 1,000 members', because it divided the congregation.

6. Brunswick Methodist Chapel, Wade Lane, near the Merrion Centre (1825-1976)

When it was built, it was the largest Methodist chapel in existence. When the church organ was installed in 1827, it was described as 'the organ which cost 1,000 and 1,000 members', because it divided the congregation.
Leodis
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St James's was unusual in that it was an octagonal church. It was so close to Leeds Parish Church it had no parish boundary, meaning it was informally known as the 'church without a parish'.

7. St James's Church, New York Street, near Kirkgate Market (1801-1951)

St James's was unusual in that it was an octagonal church. It was so close to Leeds Parish Church it had no parish boundary, meaning it was informally known as the 'church without a parish'.
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