Review: Aladdin - The rock ‘n’ Roll Pantomine at Leeds City Varieties

FESTIVE MUSICAL: Aladdin - Rock and Roll Panto at City Varieties Music Hall
FESTIVE MUSICAL: Aladdin - Rock and Roll Panto at City Varieties Music Hall
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“You won’t be seeing stars not in this pantomime”, quips the Princess and how right she is.

There are no big names or X Factor acts in this production,just an energetic, young talented cast that turn the traditional tale of Aladdin into pantomime at its very best. 
With clever staging, a chocolate 
box fairy-tale set, glittering costumes and simple, but very effective effects Aladdin engages its audience from the opening moments.

One of the secrets of its success lies with its cast of actor-musicians who waste no time in developing a great rapport with the audience in the intimate atmosphere of this historic old theatre.

Full of audience participation you can cheer the goodies, hiss the baddie and shout until you are hoarse and that’s what pantomime is all about.

There’s all the old running gags that are as old as the hills juxtaposed with references to Meghan Markle and Harry plus a copious amount of slapstick yet the story never strays from the traditional tale of the Arabian Nights.

As Aladdin, Alex Wingfield’s infectious personality brings 
warmth and vitality to the role coupled with a great singing voice. Grace Lancaster as the Princess blends beautifully into the story and she and Wingfield are a real ‘dream team’.

Justin Brett’s Widow Twankee is raucous, garish and in your face with just the right amount of sophistication and innuendo and teams well with Kenny Davies’s nice-but-dim Wishee.

In Dan Bottomley’s Abanazer we have a baddie who is guaranteed not to frighten even the smallest child – in fact he could do with being a tad more wicked!

Aladdin’s music appeals to everyone from tiny tots to grannies as they can clap, sing and dance to it, but most of all it has an enormous Christmas feel good factor.

To January 7.

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