North Leeds church to host election hustings

St Andrew's United Reform Church on Shaftesbury Avenue, Roundhay
St Andrew's United Reform Church on Shaftesbury Avenue, Roundhay
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Residents in north east Leeds will have the chance to see their general election candidates grilled on key issues in a Question Time-style hustings.

Candidates will be in the hotseat on Thursday at St Andrew’s Roundhay United Reformed Church for the hustings which is open to everyone in the community.

The event has been organised by Churches Together in Roundhay and will be chaired by Rev David Pickering, minister at St Andrew’s.

The Leeds North East candidates who will be taking part are: Aqila Choudhry of the Liberal Democrats, Celia Foote of the Alliance for Green Socialism, Labour’s Fabian Hamilton, Simon Wilson of the Conservative party and Warren Hendon of UK Independence party.

The Green party’s Leeds North East candidate, Emma Carter, is unable to attend but will be represented by Dr Martin Hemingway, the Green party candidate for Morley and Outwood.

Rev David Pickering said: “The churches have organised this hustings event to help strengthen our democracy by giving the community the chance to question the candidates and get answers on key issues. At 6.45pm there will be a chance to submit questions and meet the candidates informally.

“At 7.30pm, we’ll start the Question Time-style hustings.

“I will include questions covering as many key issues as possible before we finish at 9.15pm.

“This is an event for anyone in our community.

“We look forward to welcoming both seasoned voters and anyone voting for the first time, and hope that the hustings may help people in making their decision about who to vote for on polling day.”

The action starts at 6.45pm at the church on Shaftesbury Avenue, Roundhay on April 23.

For more information email the church on info@standrews.cc.

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