Old lady’s wish to be an air traffic controller comes true at Leeds Bradford Airport

Ina Dunn, 86, from Headingley has always loved airplanes. So when staff at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice told her she was going to spend a day with the air traffic controllers at Leeds-Bradford airport, she could not believe it.
Ina Dunn, 86, from Headingley has always loved airplanes. So when staff at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice told her she was going to spend a day with the air traffic controllers at Leeds-Bradford airport, she could not believe it.
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A high-flying pensioner discovered the sky’s the limit when she spent a day with the air traffic controllers at Leeds-Bradford Airport.

Ina Dunn, 86, has always loved aeroplanes and dreamed of working with the air traffic control staff at her local airport.

Ina Dunn, 86, from Headingley has always loved airplanes. So when staff at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice told her she was going to spend a day with the air traffic controllers at Leeds-Bradford airport, she could not believe it.

Ina Dunn, 86, from Headingley has always loved airplanes. So when staff at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice told her she was going to spend a day with the air traffic controllers at Leeds-Bradford airport, she could not believe it.

Mrs Dunn, from Headingley, has chronic condition COPD and attends the day care service at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice.

One day, a nurse asked Mrs Dunn is there was anything she really loved and wanted to do - and she revealed her air traffic control dream. Soon afterwards, the staff at the hospice were able to make her dream come true.

Mrs Dunn said: “I have no words to describe the day. I still get emotional only thinking of it.

“I was high for two days after this experience. I loved every minute. They also let me wear earphones pretending I was working with them.

“What the staff at Wheatfields Hospice did for me is priceless. They made an old lady very happy.”

Kate Bratt-Farrar, hospice director, said: “We strive to provide the best possible care to our patients, but we recognise that this is much more than just providing clinical care.

“It’s about everything that matters to each individual.

“Wherever possible our staff and volunteers will always try to ensure patients can build precious memories while we are supporting them. We have helped organise weddings, family celebrations, girls’ nights in and picnics with friends.”

Day therapy gives people the opportunity to spend time in a hospice without being admitted as an inpatient – allowing them to access the care and support they need while continuing to live at home. Find out more at www.sueryder.org/wheatfields

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