Leeds major trauma unit hospital staff in triathlon effort for charity

Trauma staff at the LGI get ready for a mammoth fundraising mission by taking part in the Weymouth Iron Man Triathlon this weekend.
Pictured on the helipad are Sarah Howard and Anthony Howard whose idea the iron man cahllenge it was. 
12 September 2017.  Picture Bruce Rollinson
Trauma staff at the LGI get ready for a mammoth fundraising mission by taking part in the Weymouth Iron Man Triathlon this weekend. Pictured on the helipad are Sarah Howard and Anthony Howard whose idea the iron man cahllenge it was. 12 September 2017. Picture Bruce Rollinson
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Doctors, nurses and support staff from the Leeds Major Trauma Centre will undertake a brutal 70.3-mile triathlon to raise funds for a vital charity.

Workers from the Leeds General Infirmary facility are doing the Ironman challenge in Weymouth on Sunday, and each raising £1,000 for Day One – a charity which is committed to making a positive impact on trauma care in England.

Trauma staff at the LGI get ready for a mammoth fundraising mission by taking part in the Weymouth Iron Man Triathlon this weekend.
Pictured on the helipad are William Bolton, Sarah Howard,  Sophie Earle, Clare Bassett,  Anthony Howard, Millad Ahmadi, Amy Lindh,,George Kleftouris.
12 September 2017.  Picture Bruce Rollinson

Trauma staff at the LGI get ready for a mammoth fundraising mission by taking part in the Weymouth Iron Man Triathlon this weekend. Pictured on the helipad are William Bolton, Sarah Howard, Sophie Earle, Clare Bassett, Anthony Howard, Millad Ahmadi, Amy Lindh,,George Kleftouris. 12 September 2017. Picture Bruce Rollinson

Eighteen people associated with the unit will take part in the 1.2-mile sea swim, 56-mile cycle and a 13.1-mile run – with 13 of them set to endure the full route – within eight-and-a-half hours.

Orthopaedic registrar Dr Anthony Howard, 47, is to undertake the swim and cycle as part of a relay with Day One founder Professor Peter Giannoudis, who will complete the running race.

Dr Howard, of Harrogate, said the charity is “really important” because it helps people get their life back together when they “are at their most vulnerable.

“It’s absolutely fundamental – how somebody feels, how independent they are, how they process what’s happened to them – affects their recovery.”

Speaking about the race, he added: “I’m relatively new to triathlons but I can tell you that it’s a really big undertaking.

“Exercising for seven-and-a-half hours is a really big thing, so the guys are incredible to do this.

“The buzz when you get to the finish line is just incredible. Particularly when the last person gets home – it will be a special moment.”

Around 70 per cent of the 18 taking part have trained for eight months especially for the challenge.

Day One is affiliated to the Leeds Hospital Charitable Foundation, but is aiming to grow and support other major trauma centres nationwide.

It is comprised not just of fundraisers, but dedicated medical and legal experts, many of whom have experienced major trauma themselves.

Prof Giannoudis, who is also professor of orthapaedic surgery at the centre, said: “It’s a fantastic effort from staff, patients and friends who are joining together to raise funds for the great cause of Day One.”

Dr Howard said that because of the charity, “we are able to go the extra mile in terms of helping patients.”

And the surgeon appealed for people to financially support the cause.

He said: “You never know when you might need that help yourself. Nobody wakes up thinking ‘I’m going to have an accident today’.”

People are able to pledge funds of any amount at www.justgiving.com/companyteams/DayOne

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