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The eight Leeds gems you might walk right past

They are the gems which are at risk of being ignored with the daily hussle and bussle of daily life in Leeds.

But take the time and trouble to stop, look around or look up, and you will be rewarded with a visually stunning architecture all boasting a rich history and heritage. Here are eight ideas:

It is Holbeck's only grade 1 listed building and a nod to the wealth, ambition and boastfulness of our Victorian predecessors. Temple Works was built, in Egyptian style, between 1836 and 1840 by John Marshall.

1. A Victorian Egyptian temple in Holbeck

It is Holbeck's only grade 1 listed building and a nod to the wealth, ambition and boastfulness of our Victorian predecessors. Temple Works was built, in Egyptian style, between 1836 and 1840 by John Marshall.
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Thousands will walk past here every day - whether to work in the swanky financial district, shop in Trinity Leeds, or enjoy a cocktail in a trendy wine bar - and barely cast an eye at the little chapel that dates back to 1674.

2. Mill Hill Chapel, Leeds citry centre

Thousands will walk past here every day - whether to work in the swanky financial district, shop in Trinity Leeds, or enjoy a cocktail in a trendy wine bar - and barely cast an eye at the little chapel that dates back to 1674.
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Look at the finer details of the grade 1 listed LGI. Bearing a Victorian Gothic frontage in red brick with stone dressings, red granite pillars, slate roof and Venetian Gothic windows, it looks like something from a Dickens novel.

3. Leeds General Infirmary - a design influenced by Florence Nightingale.

Look at the finer details of the grade 1 listed LGI. Bearing a Victorian Gothic frontage in red brick with stone dressings, red granite pillars, slate roof and Venetian Gothic windows, it looks like something from a Dickens novel.
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May well just look like any other derelict building but it's one of the most treasured buildings in the city. Built on Kirkgate on a site provided by Lord Irvine of Temple Newsam, with 1,000 given by merchants and tradesmen.

4. First Cloth Hall - preserving a piece of textile heritage

May well just look like any other derelict building but it's one of the most treasured buildings in the city. Built on Kirkgate on a site provided by Lord Irvine of Temple Newsam, with 1,000 given by merchants and tradesmen.
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