Historic map goes on display to all at Yorkshire Museum

Curator of natural science, Sarah King with the William Smith map at the Yorkshire Museum in York.  PIC: Tony Johnson
Curator of natural science, Sarah King with the William Smith map at the Yorkshire Museum in York. PIC: Tony Johnson
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The world’s first geological map, which underpinned the Industrial Revolution and helped discover a more accurate age of the planet, has gone on show, 200 years after its creation.

William “Strata” Smith, whose nephew, John Phillips, was the first keeper of the Yorkshire Museum, in York, made the geological map of England and Wales in 1815, which at the time was the most accurate depiction of the subterranean world ever made.

To mark its bicentenary the Yorkshire Museum will display the recently conserved map, which is 1.8m by 2.6m in size and the only copy on public show in the North.

For possible use in the YP From the Archive series.''10th May 1988''THE MIGHTY Mallard, pride of Britain's railway history, puffed into Leeds Station today with a raging thirst.''It was pulling such a heavy load - 12 carriages carrying 250 top Post Office customers and stamp collectors - that it needed extra water supplies at Holbeck.''"The last thing we wanted was the boiler blowing up on Britain's pride and joy," said Mr Philip Round, Post Office Information Officer.''Mallard was making a special run across the Pennines from Manchester Victoria to mark two major anniversaries:

Leeds nostalgia: Mallard pulls into Leeds to mark 50th anniversary of world speed record... in 1988