Fire crews help rescue ferret in a fix

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A rescue mission was launched in Ossett after a foolish ferret became tangled in metal railings.

RSPCA inspector Charly Wain was first on the scene at the DVLA centre, on Mothers Way, after being alerted by a member of the public, but quickly called the fire brigade for help. It is thought the ferret - later named Whoops - had gone through the fence and got stuck, but instead of backing out had turned and gone the other way - becoming even more wedged.

Inspector Wain said: “There’s no way the poor little ferret could have got out on his own, and he was so badly tangled up, I knew I would have to call the fire service for help. They arrived and were soon able to cut a section from the fence that the ferret, now named Whoops, was stuck in.”

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Station Commander at Ossett Fire Station, Ian Stead said: “On arrival I consulted with the RSPCA inspector and a representative of the driving test centre. The fence in which the ferret was trapped formed part of the perimeter of a compound used for motorcycle driving tests.

“I checked the ferret and found it to be alert but completely stuck in the lower part of the fence. The ferret tried to bite anyone who went near it.

“I requested a fire engine from Ossett to attend. After the arrival of the appliance we entered the compound and cut a section of the fence out with bolt croppers. The ferret and section of fence were then transported to the local vets.”

Insp Wain took him to Abbey House Vets in Morley who had to sedate him before untangling him from the wire. Vet Laura Smith said: “This was such an unusual situation, I’ve never seen anything like it.”

She added: “It was easy enough to carefully ease his head out of the first bar, but the second was firmly stuck around his middle as he is really quite a chubby ferret. Between me and vet nurses Gillian Kerrod and Candice Dyson, we managed to cut him out completely once he was anaesthetised. All in all it took around 15 minutes, and after we monitored him overnight he was doing so well we released him back to the RSPCA to take him to a rehoming centre.”

A Facebook post on Abbey House Vets’ page telling of Whoops’ plight and appealing to trace his owner has been shared over 250 times. But with no-one coming forward, Whoops has now been taking to a ferret rescue centre in Cheshire. Insp Wain added: “There could have been a very different ending for Whoops but thankfully he is unharmed and will now go on to find a loving new home.”

� Charlotte Graham 
Picture Taken 06/10/2017. 
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Early Morning Light on Harold Park with Swans in the foreground

The park is named after Harold Gathorn Hardy who died in 1881 at the age of 32. Harold helped establish the family run Low Moor Ironworks.In 1899 a recreation ground was added to the park, while in the early 20th century Low Moor Gala was held raising money for local hospitals. In 1931 Horsfall playing fields were added to the park, in 2014 these became a Queen Elizabeth II Playing fields and also contains Horsfall Stadium.

Harold Park is a small urban park in Low Moor, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. The park is open all day all year round. To the immediate north of Harold Park is Horsfall Stadium home to Bradford Park Avenue A.F.C. and Albion Sports A.F.C. Park Dam is a short walking distance to the south.

The park has been given a Green Flag Award and the Platinum award from The Royal Horticultural Society Yorkshire in Bloom for open spaces.

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