Escape the New Year’s Eve chaos with our ale trail

Date:24th February 2016. Picture James Hardisty.'Restaurant Review Whitelocks and Turks Heads, Turk's Head Yard, Leeds. Pictured Exterior of Whitelocks.
Date:24th February 2016. Picture James Hardisty.'Restaurant Review Whitelocks and Turks Heads, Turk's Head Yard, Leeds. Pictured Exterior of Whitelocks.
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Let’s face it, going out on New Year’s Eve can be a nightmare.

The bars are packed, the noise is deafening and the midnight moment often proves a little bit...flat.

Bishopgate Street, Leeds

Bishopgate Street, Leeds

But we know you’ll do your best to power through.

You can always get Jools on catch-up.

So here’s the YEP’s guide to some of the best ale pubs in the city which may – doubtfully, but may – provide a cosy antidote to the beat-thumping madness of the city’s clubs.

First up is Foleys Tap House on The Headrow.

Date: 26th July 2017.'Picture James Hardisty'Barfly......Mr Foleys' The Headrow, Leeds.

Date: 26th July 2017.'Picture James Hardisty'Barfly......Mr Foleys' The Headrow, Leeds.

This was Camra Pub of the Year for Leeds in 2017 - so it would be churlish not to pay it a visit on the final day if you’re in the neighbourhood.

York Brewery’s pub also won the same accolade for cider last year, meaning those with fruitier tastes are well catered for. The pub is homed in the impressive Grade II-listed Pearl Chambers opposite Leeds Art Gallery.

Next up is The Angel, which is located in an alley off Briggate. December 31 can be an expensive night, so it’s worth making use of this Samuel Smith’s pub which offers pints for less than £2.

If you’re lucky enough to get a seat in one of the regal upstairs rooms (don’t count on it), you could find yourself holed up for a good portion of the evening.

From there head to Whitelock’s Ale House, and/or the Turk’s Head sister pubs.

The former – Leeds’s oldest pub –was built in 1715, with its current interior dating from the late 1800s, and was taken over in 2012 with its heritage preserved.

Established brewers such as Theakston and Timothy Taylor get a good showing here.

The Turk’s Head was opened in January 2016, but it’s totally different inside from its more historical sister, and well worth a visit.

From here, it’s up to The Head of Steam on Mill Hill.

Punters can usually expect 30 keg beers and cask ales, as well as 180 bottled beers. Some Belgian Trappist beers – brewed by monks at one of only 11 monasteries – are available, and the pub’s circular bar area is prime for putting the year to rights with a good old lean-and-chat.

Nip round the corner to the Scarbrough Hotel, which after The Victoria Hotel and The Palace have changed hands, is the city’s only remaining pub run by heritage specialist Nicholson’s. A pint of the company’s decent own brew will await you.

Leeds Brewery, naturally, deserves a look-in.

The Brewery Tap on New Station Street has just had a makeover, so it’s a good candidate to bring a bit of style to proceedings.

After that? Straight home, of course...

Millennium Square and Leeds Civic Hall, Leeds City Centre.

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