Enter Metallica with spectacular Leeds Festival finale

Metallica on the main stage at Leeds Festival.
Metallica on the main stage at Leeds Festival.
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This year’s Leeds Festival will not so much be remembered for what it had but more for what it did not have – namely mud.

The Great British summer shone on Bramham Park – for the most part anyway – giving festival-goers three days of sunshine and music.

Metallica on the main stage.

Metallica on the main stage.

Last night’s closing set from Metallica brought a fitting finale to this year’s festival.

The band had promised the most expensive show in the history of the festival, and as soon as they hit the stage fans knew this would be the case.

With gigantic LED screens, every inch of the stage was used with the band even bringing up selected audience members to rock out behind drummer Lars Ulrich.

Speaking before Metallica took the stage, festival director Melvin Benn said: “I’ve seen them play I don’t know how many times, and I was genuinely blown away by how big it was.

Metallica on the main stage.

Metallica on the main stage.

“I think it will be the best thing anyone has ever seen at Leeds.”

When asked how he and his team will top 2015, Mr Benn told the YEP: “I just don’t know! Every year we push ourselves to be better than the previous year.

“The Metallica stage presentation is absolutely spectacular.

“In terms of next year, we can only wait and see who we will announce. We already have one headliner secured.”

Saturday saw English folk and indie band Mumford & Sons bring their sounds to the Main Stage.

The band played to the audience, telling them how much better looking they were than their southern counterparts.

Leeds band Alt-J supported them gainfully with an emotional set as the sun went down.

Keyboardist Gus Unger-Hamilton told the crowd: “It’s great to be home.

“Thank you for such a wonderful reception in the city where it all began.”

Dean Turner UK economist at UBS Wealth Management

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