Age is no barrier when it comes to friendship

Children from Flowerpots Day Nursery meet residents at  Pennington Court. Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe.
Children from Flowerpots Day Nursery meet residents at Pennington Court. Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe.
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There may be an age gap of around 80 years.

But for a group of nursery children and pensioners in Leeds, it’s a friendship that knows no bounds.

Children from Flowerpots day nursery entertaining residents at  Pennington Court.  Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe.

Children from Flowerpots day nursery entertaining residents at Pennington Court. Picture Jonathan Gawthorpe.

Youngsters from Flower Pots Day Nursery, in Beeston, visit residents at the nearby Pennington Court Nursing Home twice a month, where they sing together, mould Playdoh, play musical instruments and dance.

They know each other by name, with children singing songs like “bye bye Peggy nice to see you” and make birthday cards, including one for a 101-year old resident last week.

Sarah Young, deputy manager at the two-year-old nursery, which has just received a ‘good’ rating from Ofsted, said: “I think it’s nice for the children because they get to have different types of conversation and there are quite a lot who don’t have elderly people or grandparents in their families.

“There are also a lot of children who have moved over to England and their family still lives in another country.

“So it’s nice to bridge that gap between two very far apart generations.”

Last week the children, who are aged three and four, made harvest baskets for the residents, thanks to donations for parents, and also baked cakes for their elderly friends.

Miss Young said: “The children have also been learning Autumn songs so they will also be singing one of those. We have had some lovely feedback from parents who think it’s marvellous as they are getting to interact with another generation. It’s also teaching them to be respectful as they have to interact in a completely different way.

“It is beneficial for both.”

Around 20 children were taken home by their parents

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