Charity hits out at social media sites after police report videos of Leeds children fighting

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A national children's charity has criticised social media companies for failing to remove disturbing content after police in Leeds had to request the closure of a page featuring children fighting.

The page, published on Facebook and Instagram, featured 18 videos of school pupils fighting as well as several posts encouraging people to 'send in your videos'.

It included violent scraps between schoolchildren thought to be as young as 11.

West Yorkshire Police reported the Facebook page at the weekend in an attempt to get in closed down and are working with schools officers to identify the children involved.

READ MORE: Police attempting to shut down 'dangerous' Facebook page featuring videos of school children fighting in Leeds

An NSPCC spokesman said the fight page and others like it posed serious questions about the community standards of social media sites and their ability to moderate content.

“It is time for social media companies to be held to account for the material on their sites and pay more attention to their safeguarding duties to protect children and young people, whether they are viewing the content or appearing in it," he said.

"Online videos showing violence between children must be removed immediately and we urge anyone who sees similar footage to report it and not share it further.”

Both accounts now appear to have been closed down following the intervention of police, who have urged people to let them know about prearranged fights in the city.

Adults with concerns about a child’s safety can contact the NSPCC helpline for advice on 0808 800 5000.

Children and young people can contact Childline for free, confidential support and advice 24 hours a day on 0800 1111 or at www.childline.org.uk

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