ITV endures fall in revenue

Photo of Christine Tew, a retired registrar-turned-DJ also known as Dizzy Twilight, during the audition stage for ITV1's talent show, Britain's Got Talent. Photo credit: Tom Dymond/Thames/Syco/PA Wire.
Photo of Christine Tew, a retired registrar-turned-DJ also known as Dizzy Twilight, during the audition stage for ITV1's talent show, Britain's Got Talent. Photo credit: Tom Dymond/Thames/Syco/PA Wire.
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Broadcasting giant ITV endured a fall in revenues at the start of the year and expects the TV advertising market to remain tough as it grapples with an “uncertain” economic environment.

The group, home to shows such as Britain’s Got Talent, Broadchurch and The Voice, saw net advertising revenue drop 9 per cent to £393m in the first quarter, but said predictions for the full-year were unchanged.

Revenues also slipped 3 per cent to £731m over the period, as it braces itself for a rough ride in the coming months, with advertising income expected to drop by between 15% and 20% in June after a boost from last year’s European Championships.

However, efforts to shift revenue streams away from the turbulent advertising market continue to bear fruit, with its ITV Studios production arm bolstering revenues by 7 per cent to £343m in the three months to the end of March this year.

The update comes as ITV remains on the hunt for a new top boss to replace outgoing chief executive Adam Crozier who will leave the company on June 30.

Mr Crozier said: “ITV’s overall performance and the shape of the UK advertising market are very much as we anticipated and our guidance for the full year remains unchanged.

“Over the first half we expect ITV Family NAR to be down 8 per cent to 9 per cent. In line with previous guidance April was up 5 per cent, while we expect May to be down 8 per cent and June to be down 15 per cent to 20 per cent against the tough comparator of the Euros last year.

“The first half performance will also be impacted by the weighting of the programme budget to the first six months and the phasing of Studios deliveries, most significantly the non-recurring benefit of The Voice of China in 2016.

“While the economic environment remains uncertain our guidance over the full year remains unchanged.”

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