Leeds nostalgia: Unsung music heroes of Leeds

Leeds.  22nd February 1984

A Leeds jazz orchestra has won national recognition in a band contest organised by BBC Radio Two.

The 18-strong City of Leeds College of Music Jazz Orchestra won the junior section of the competition, with their 21-year-old drummer, Caroline Boaden winning the Jack Parnell drum prize.

The band will be receiving the awards in London on Sunday, with the ceremony being recorded for broadcast on March 17 on Radio Two.

The band, whose ages range between 18 and 21, is led by Leeds College of Muisc lecturer, John Brown.

Mr Brown said "It's nice we have managed to get this national recognitition.  The college was unique in Europe when it started a jazz and light music course in 1965.

"Though others have followed our lead, we still have the biggest course, and all the best bands have musicians who come form the college.  I am delighted."

The band was recorded by BBC Radio Leeds as their entry for the national competition.

Drummer Caroline Boaden in action with memebers of the jazz or
Leeds. 22nd February 1984 A Leeds jazz orchestra has won national recognition in a band contest organised by BBC Radio Two. The 18-strong City of Leeds College of Music Jazz Orchestra won the junior section of the competition, with their 21-year-old drummer, Caroline Boaden winning the Jack Parnell drum prize. The band will be receiving the awards in London on Sunday, with the ceremony being recorded for broadcast on March 17 on Radio Two. The band, whose ages range between 18 and 21, is led by Leeds College of Muisc lecturer, John Brown. Mr Brown said "It's nice we have managed to get this national recognitition. The college was unique in Europe when it started a jazz and light music course in 1965. "Though others have followed our lead, we still have the biggest course, and all the best bands have musicians who come form the college. I am delighted." The band was recorded by BBC Radio Leeds as their entry for the national competition. Drummer Caroline Boaden in action with memebers of the jazz or
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With music legend Bob Dylan receiving the Nobel Prize for literature this week, we cast our minds back to some unsung heroes from Leeds.

Our first archive picture was taken on February 22, 1984. It shows Leeds jazz orchestra, which won national recognition in a band contest organised by BBC Radio 2.

Leeds.  13th April 1970

Some of the junior members of the Eta Cohen Orchestra playing at Temple Newsam.  Standing, left to right:  Nigel Gilmore, Alexa Davies, Wendy Mitchell, Pamela Courteney and Neil McDonald.  Sitting,  left to right: Siriol Jenkins and Nicolle Levine.  Behind, Rosamund Kitchen.

Leeds. 13th April 1970 Some of the junior members of the Eta Cohen Orchestra playing at Temple Newsam. Standing, left to right: Nigel Gilmore, Alexa Davies, Wendy Mitchell, Pamela Courteney and Neil McDonald. Sitting, left to right: Siriol Jenkins and Nicolle Levine. Behind, Rosamund Kitchen.

The 18-strong City of Leeds College of Music Jazz Orchestra won the junior section of the competition, with their 21-year-old drummer, Caroline Boaden winning the Jack Parnell drum prize.

The band travelled to London to receive the awards, with the ceremony being recorded for broadcast on March 17.

The band, whose ages ranged between 18 and 21, was led by Leeds College of Muisc lecturer, John Brown.

Mr Brown said at the time: “It’s nice we have managed to get this national recognition. The college was unique in Europe when it started a jazz and light music course in 1965.”

He went on: “Though others have followed our lead, we still have the biggest course and all the best bands have musicians who come form the college. I am delighted.”

The band was recorded by BBC Radio Leeds as their entry for the national competition.

In the picture, drummer Caroline Boaden is seen in action with members of the jazz orchestra outside the Leeds College of Muisc. She later left college to play drums in a band at a Leeds nightclub.

The second picture, below, was taken on April 13, 1970.

It shows some of the junior members of the Eta Cohen Orchestra playing at Temple Newsam.

Standing, left to right: Nigel Gilmore, Alexa Davies, Wendy Mitchell, Pamela Courteney and Neil McDonald. Sitting, left to right: Siriol Jenkins and Nicolle Levine. Behind, Rosamund Kitchen.

Thirsk, North Yorkshire 1967
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