Leeds nostalgia: This month in 2000: Damien Hirst pays out over copyright claim following £1m art sale

A couple admire the 'Hymn' the 20 ft high, five ton work of art by Damien Hirst on display at the Saatchi Gallery in London today 18 April 2000. The Hymn, is just one of the exhibits at the 'Ant Noises' in the North London gallery,which  opens from 20th April to 20th August. *EDI* Photo by John Stillwell/PA.
A couple admire the 'Hymn' the 20 ft high, five ton work of art by Damien Hirst on display at the Saatchi Gallery in London today 18 April 2000. The Hymn, is just one of the exhibits at the 'Ant Noises' in the North London gallery,which opens from 20th April to 20th August. *EDI* Photo by John Stillwell/PA.
0
Have your say

Artist Damien Hirst made a payout to settle a copyright dispute over his 20ft sculpture Hymn, which was bought by Charles Saatchi earlier the same year for £1m.

Hirst agreed an undisclosed sum to head off legal action for breach of copyright by the designer and makers of a tory, which bares resemblance to his work.

The size of the settlement was not revealed. The designer of the toy, which sells for £14.99, was Norman Emms, 57, a commercial sculptor in Hereford, who said the goodwill payment was less than he had hoped for.

Humbrol Ltd, maker of the Young Scientist Anatomy Set, settled for contributions by Hirst to two children’s charities, Children Nationwide and the Toy Trust, in lieu of royalties on the £1m sale.

Hirst said at the time: “I’m delighted this matter is settled to the satisfaction of all parties concerned.”

The artist also agreed to future restrictions of the polychromatic figure, which Hirst admitted in a newspaper interview was inspired by his son Connor’s anatomy set. Hymn was described by one art critic as “the first key work of British art for the 21st Century.”

l

Leeds nostalgia: Children played medieval concert instruments in 1974

l

Leeds nostalgia: Roll call for former pupils of soon-to-close 300-year-old Yorkshire school