Leeds nostalgia: Pudsey - a town that’s not for turning

1
Have your say

Judging by this view of Pudsey from December 3, 1979, not much has changed in the town, at least with this part of it.

The street today is pretty much the same as it was almost four decades ago - the only noteable difference being the vehicles parked at the side of the road and the hordings on some of the shops.

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

As mentioned briefly in this column a few weeks ago, when we published the picture of Pudsey bus station and, incidentally, recounted the ancient fables of birds flying backwards and treacle mines, back in the 1920s, Pudsey folk, who this column will testify rarely became riled, not least enough to become over-agitated and red in the face, nonetheless found their collective voice after Leeds City Council attempted to “absorb” them wholesale into the borough of Leeds.

The Leeds nad Bradford Extension Bill of 1922 would have enabled those authorities to take control of 17,000 acres of land and 48,000 people.

CLICK FOR MORE YEP NEWS HEADLINES

There was a fair bit of arrogance from the Leeds side during the public debate, not least because when giving evidence, Alderman Charles Wilson, when asked what the people of Leeds made of the plans, reportedly quipped ‘I am Leeds’.

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

A R Barrand, MP for Pudsey at the time retorted that not one single person in his borough wanted to join the city and dubbed the bid ‘unprovoked interference’ in local affairs.

Locals at the time saw the attempt as a bid by Leeds to gather more taxes but they were urged instead to turn their attentions to Harrogate and Scarborough.

And Mr Lane Fox, MP for Barkston Ash, said the bill was ‘a pure case of the aggrandisement of great boroughs at the expense of their weaker neighbours.”

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

Pudsey, 3rd December 1979''Lewtown shoppers.Tardis

Leeds nostalgia: Former Earl of Harewood (nicknamed ‘Lucky Lascelles’ during the war) died in May 1947