Leeds nostalgia: New parks and leaky lakes

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The first official suggestion that Yorkshire could gain two national parks was made on this day 70 years ago.

A report by the National Parks committee recommended creating 12 national parks, including the Yorkshire Dales (635sq miles) and North York Moors (614sq miles).

It was recommended to establish the national parks in succession, beginning with the Lake District (892sq miles), North Wales (870 miles), Peak District (572sq miles) and Dartmoor (392sq miles), with the Yorkshire parks in the second and third tranches.

The Yorkshire Dales was established as a national park in 1954, while the Lake District park was created in 1951. Both were extended to within touching distance of one another in October last year (adding an additional 180sq miles).

The Yorkshire Dales national park, 28 per cent of which is now in Cumbria, with one per cent in Lancashire, is about 840sq miles, while the Lake District is about 900sq miles.

Also on this day, reports of a serious leak from Waterloo Lake, Roundhay Park.

Men were working to stop the leak in the bank near the waterfall, which was first noticed some days earlier but had become progressively worse to the point where it was in danger of undermining the waterfall.

One method of alleviating the leak was to drop the level of water in the lake and this, in turn, affected boating on the lake.

Ernest Kavanagh, chair of the parks committee said: “Boating may have to be stopped if repairs make it necessary to reduce the level still more.”

Meanwhile, an advert from the day suggested taking a “working” holiday and helping bring in the harvest at the same time.

Guiseley, Harry Ramsden's 30th October 1989

Waitresses wait for fish and chips.

Leeds nostalgia: October 1989: Memories of Harry Ramsden’s