Leeds nostalgia: Masters of the green baize

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As the World Snooker Championships in Sheffield reach a conclusion later this week we look back at some past masters of the green baize.

In 1986, golden era favourites Tony Knowles and, our own World Champion, Joe Johnson attended this charity bash for Wheatfields Hospice.

Was he the greatest snooker player of all time? The Legendary Joe Davis lines up a shot at the Peoples Hall, Leeds in 1950. His opponent was local player Willie Smith, regarded by many as the greatest ever billiards player. Willie was photographed again in 1962 when he demonstrated the use of the short rest to beginners.

Leeds Deaf Centre in 1976 was a typical haunt of many players before the televised snooker boom.

Finally, the much missed David Vine tackled this shot at the Northern Snooker Centre in Leeds in 1991.

1986: Joe Johnson and Tony Knowles join the cue queue with, on the left, Miss Moira O'Donnell, Matron of Wheatfields Hospice and the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Coun. Rose Lund, at the charity tournament at the Civic Hall, Leeds.

1986: Joe Johnson and Tony Knowles join the cue queue with, on the left, Miss Moira O'Donnell, Matron of Wheatfields Hospice and the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Coun. Rose Lund, at the charity tournament at the Civic Hall, Leeds.

1950
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Joe Davis in action at Peoples Hall, Leeds.

1950 : Joe Davis in action at Peoples Hall, Leeds.

1962
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Willie Smith, fromer world professional billiards champion in an interview with Evening Post sports reporter Bill Mallinson.

The correct use of the short rest ia a phase of billiards and snooker about which the average amateur knows very little and which the beginner simply abhors.

By far the biggest fault made by these players is that the rest is held in the left hand, off the table, while an attempt is made to play the stroke.  Of course, the rest wobbles and the player wobbles and his shot is a failure.

As the photograph shows, the rest should be held firmly on the table with the left hand.  The rest head should not be nearer than one foot from the cue ball.

My fellow professionals often told me they could not understand how I got such power and accuracy into the strokes I played when using the rest but the answer is in the photograph.

I always liked to be behind the ball and never shirked the use of the rest because I was not a "left-handed expert" like Melbourne Inman and Joe Davis w

1962 : Willie Smith, fromer world professional billiards champion in an interview with Evening Post sports reporter Bill Mallinson. The correct use of the short rest ia a phase of billiards and snooker about which the average amateur knows very little and which the beginner simply abhors. By far the biggest fault made by these players is that the rest is held in the left hand, off the table, while an attempt is made to play the stroke. Of course, the rest wobbles and the player wobbles and his shot is a failure. As the photograph shows, the rest should be held firmly on the table with the left hand. The rest head should not be nearer than one foot from the cue ball. My fellow professionals often told me they could not understand how I got such power and accuracy into the strokes I played when using the rest but the answer is in the photograph. I always liked to be behind the ball and never shirked the use of the rest because I was not a "left-handed expert" like Melbourne Inman and Joe Davis w

Guiseley, Harry Ramsden's 30th October 1989

Waitresses wait for fish and chips.

Leeds nostalgia: October 1989: Memories of Harry Ramsden’s