Leeds nostalgia: Leeds twice missed out on ‘underground’

must credit it as c/o the National Tramway Museum. shows 1930s plans for a leeds underground.
must credit it as c/o the National Tramway Museum. shows 1930s plans for a leeds underground.
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Did you know... in the 1930s, Leeds City Council seriously considered the possibility of beginning work on an underground system, with the main station beneath City Square.

The plans were published in the Railway Gazette in 1939. The initial plans were to have terminuses running out toward Roundhay, Cross Gates, Bramley and Hunslet. The estimated cost at the time was £500,000 per mile.

In 1944, WIlliam Moorland, general manager of Leeds City Transport, submitted a further proposal to build an underground railway system in order to ease growing traffic congestion. His east-west line was to run from the Woodpecker Junction to Wellington Street, his north-south line from North Street to Lower Briggate and from Woodhouse Lane to Neville Street via City Square. The cost of that scheme was estimated to be about £750,000 per mile but the idea was shelved in October 1945 when the Labour group took over.

Leeds twice missed out on getting its own underground, something commuters today would relish - sadly, whenever the idea has been proposed, local councillors have cited lack of funds and the idea has been buried. Is it time Leeds had an underground? Tell us what you think...

Skipton, 27th August 1980

Mr. Lambert Alderson, 62, of Alexandra Terrace, Skipton seen withhis colleagues Mr. Arnold Beck, left, and Mr. Marc Symes, right, won a �50 bonus from Craven District Council for the care he had taken collecting refuse.

Yorkshire nostalgia: Skipton bin man gets reward for being quie