Leeds nostalgia: June 1917: Germans forced to leap from burning airship which attacked English coast

German Naval Airship L13 which carried out raids over Midlands and Yorkshire 1916: Zeppelin L13 was brought into commission in August 1915 and was commanded by Kapitan-Leutnant Mathy, the Zeppelin 'ace'. Mathy and his crew perished in 1916 when L31 was shot down by Captain Tempest over Potters Bar.
German Naval Airship L13 which carried out raids over Midlands and Yorkshire 1916: Zeppelin L13 was brought into commission in August 1915 and was commanded by Kapitan-Leutnant Mathy, the Zeppelin 'ace'. Mathy and his crew perished in 1916 when L31 was shot down by Captain Tempest over Potters Bar.
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One hundred years ago this week, reports ran in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer of dramatic developments from the war with Germany - a zeppelin was brought down in flames.

The report says: “An attack was made on a coast town about half-past two but the airship was driven off by the guns and by our aviators and shortly after three, after a fight with one or two of the Royal Flying Corps machines, was brought down in flames a few miles from the coast.

“All the crew were either burnt to death or killed by jumping or falling to the ground. The fight was watched by thousands of people.”

The airship in question had raided East Anglia on June 17 and was brought down having done no damage.

However, another German airship bombed the coast of Kent, leading to the deaths of two people and 16 being injured, together with damage to houses.

Of that incident, the report notes: “The other airship... dropped six bombs on a coast town. Many houses were damaged and two persons killed and 16 injured.”

In the same edition (Monday June 18, 1917), there is also an advert for ‘Rose’s Lime Juice’, which notes: “Restricted supplies of sugar and the urgent requirements of the War Office, British Red Cross Society and the YMCA for Rose’s Lime Juice Cordial for the use of the British Expeditionary Forces and wounded in hospital, have necessitated a stoppage in the supply to the general public, so long as the urgency exists.

It goes on: “Should your grocer, wine merchant or druggist be unable to supply you with cordial, try a bottle of Rose’s unsweetened Lime Juice at the same price.”

The advert suggests adding soda water and adds: “Rose’s Lime Juice will keep you fit.”

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