Leeds nostalgia: Games move with the times

York.  28th July 1985

THERE were thousands of "dead" at the Royal York Hotel in York over the weekend.  Tanks were burning, battle elephants lay with feet twitching in the air and Napoleonic infantrymen were falling like ninepins.

The only missing element of military mayhem was a nuclear blast because even war game warriors, it seems, are reluctant to use the ultimate deterrent.

"Nuking" one's opponent, apparently, is frowned upon although the ability is built into the rules of the modern table top battles.  War games expert Phil Barker commented: "I only saw one man fire a tactical nuclear weapon in a war game and he lost."
York. 28th July 1985 THERE were thousands of "dead" at the Royal York Hotel in York over the weekend. Tanks were burning, battle elephants lay with feet twitching in the air and Napoleonic infantrymen were falling like ninepins. The only missing element of military mayhem was a nuclear blast because even war game warriors, it seems, are reluctant to use the ultimate deterrent. "Nuking" one's opponent, apparently, is frowned upon although the ability is built into the rules of the modern table top battles. War games expert Phil Barker commented: "I only saw one man fire a tactical nuclear weapon in a war game and he lost."
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A duo of ‘game themed’ pictures this week, the first from March 26, 1971 in Leeds.

The caption read: “Does Leeds have in common with Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge? The answer is quite simply: ‘Go. Go is the name of an ancient Chinese board game that is becoming increasingly popular in the West.

Leeds.  26th March 1971

ALL SYSTEMS 'GO' FOR THE CONGRESS

WHAT DOES Leeds have in common with Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge?  The answer is quite simply - Go.

Go is the name of an ancient Chinese board game that is becoming increasingly popular in the West.

Although the rules are simple the game is on a par with chess and bridge for its complexity and testing power.

The game, said to be at least 5,000 years old, will be played in Leeds this weekend, for the 4th British Go Congress is being held at Leeds University's Devonshire Hall, this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

It is the first time the congress has been held in the North.  Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge were the last venues.

More than 70 people are expected to be competing for the title of the British Go Champion during the course of the three-day congress.  The present champion, Mr. John Diamond, will be defending his title.

"The games is at least 5,000 years old and came originally from China.  Eventually the Japanese began to play the game and

Leeds. 26th March 1971 ALL SYSTEMS 'GO' FOR THE CONGRESS WHAT DOES Leeds have in common with Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge? The answer is quite simply - Go. Go is the name of an ancient Chinese board game that is becoming increasingly popular in the West. Although the rules are simple the game is on a par with chess and bridge for its complexity and testing power. The game, said to be at least 5,000 years old, will be played in Leeds this weekend, for the 4th British Go Congress is being held at Leeds University's Devonshire Hall, this Friday, Saturday and Sunday. It is the first time the congress has been held in the North. Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge were the last venues. More than 70 people are expected to be competing for the title of the British Go Champion during the course of the three-day congress. The present champion, Mr. John Diamond, will be defending his title. "The games is at least 5,000 years old and came originally from China. Eventually the Japanese began to play the game and

“Although the rules are simple the game is on a par with chess and bridge for its complexity and testing power.

“The game, said to be at least 5,000 years old, will be played in Leeds this weekend, for the 4th British Go Congress is being held at Leeds University’s Devonshire Hall, this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

“It is the first time the congress has been held in the North. Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge were the last venues.

“More than 70 people are expected to be competing for the title of the British Go Champion during the course of the three-day congress. The present champion, John Diamond, will be defending his title.”

The games is at least 5,000 years old and came originally from China. Eventually the Japanese began to play the game and finally it reached the West.

The second picture (below), comes from York in July 28, 1985. It’s caption reads: “There were thousands of ‘dead’ at the Royal York Hotel. Tanks were burning, battle elephants lay with feet twitching and Napoleonic infantrymen were falling like ninepins.

The only missing element was a nuclear blast because war games were reluctant to use it.

‘Nuking’ one’s opponent was, apparently, frowned upon although the ability is built into the rules of the modern table top battles. War games expert Phil Barker commented: “I only saw one man fire a tactical nuclear weapon in a war game and he lost.”

Leeds nostalgia: November 1917: Scandal over Dutch Blue Circle cement used for building German defences