Leeds nostalgia: Film screening to mark end of Battle of the Somme

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The Royal Armouries will mark the centenary of the end of the battle of the Somme with a special screening of the ground-breaking film, The Battle of the Somme, accompanied by live orchestral music.

compelling record of one of the key battles of the First Word War, The Battle of the Somme was the first feature length documentary record of combat. Seen by millions of British citizens within the first month of its release in 1916, it allowed the civilian home-front audience to share the experiences of the front-line soldier.

The tragic events of the battle, fought from July to November 1916 left a deep mark on the nation – costing the lives of soldiers from cities, towns and villages across the country.

Part of the Somme100 FILM: an international project to mark the 100th anniversary of the First World War Battle of the Somme this screening of the 1916 film, shot by Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell, will be accompanied by UK composer Laura Rossi’s acclaimed score, commissioned by the Imperial War Museum. The music will be performed by students of Leeds College of Music Community Orchestra, conducted by Ben Crick.

The event will take place tomorrow (November 13), from 3pm-5pm. Tickets are available for £5 for adults and £3 for concessions. The performance is suitable for those aged 12 and over. Further information and tickets can be purchased online at www.royalarmouries.org/. Entry to the museum is free.

Rachael Bevan, Events Manager at the Royal Armouries said. “It is incredible to think that The Battle of the Somme was seen by almost half the population in the UK when it was first released. Given the numbers of men who joined the Pals regiments across Yorkshire a glimpse of a loved one on film must have been a very emotional experience for their families and friends at home. The concert and screening will be an opportunity to remember those who fought in the First World War.”

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