Leeds nostalgia: City marks Peace Day 1902

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Just look how much Boar Lane has altered. The original picture, taken on June 1, 1902 (Peace Day), shows trams navigating their way along the thoroughfare, people thronging in the streets and Union Jacks draped from buildings the whole way along the road.

The flags were hung despite the fact it was a Sunday, which would have normally prohibited such pracises. It was one of the few times the Yorkshire Post has gone to press on a Sunday, pushing out a special edition for the occasion.

Tardis... Boar Lane, Leeds. Peace Day 1902 BLEND

Tardis... Boar Lane, Leeds. Peace Day 1902 BLEND

According to a report from the day, “it was partly due to the shouts of the newsboys that the news reached the outlying suburbs, the vigorous shouts of the newsboys speedily bringing people to the windows and doors.”

Treaty of Vereeniging (commonly referred to as Peace of Vereeniging) was the peace treaty, signed on May 31, 1902, that ended the Second Boer War between the South African Republic and the Republic of the Orange Free State, on the one side, and the British Empire on the other.

The Boers, also known as Afrikaners, were the descendants of the original Dutch settlers of southern Africa. Britain took possession of the Dutch Cape colony in 1806 during the Napoleonic wars, sparking resistance from the independence-minded Boers, who resented the Anglicization of South Africa and Britain’s anti-slavery policies.

The two new republics lived peaceably with their British neighbors until 1867, when the discovery of diamonds and gold in the region made conflict between the Boer states and Britain inevitable.

Tardis... Boar Lane, Leeds. Peace Day 1902

Tardis... Boar Lane, Leeds. Peace Day 1902

By 1902, the British had crushed the Boer resistance, and on May 31 of that year, the Peace of Vereeniging was signed, ending hostilities, cementing the British Empire.

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Ilkley, 30th July 1976

Ted Carroll, the TV and film extra with the 180 degree nose, is learning to live with himself at his pub in Ilkley, West Yorkshire.

The new Ted, with the old nose, is a bronze bust modelled by a sculptress at Ilkley College.
In fact Janet Bowler's Ted Carroll is even more rugged than the real thing.
Ted let his nose go its own way after having it broken four times during his 12 years with Hunslet Rugby League Club.
"She left it over the holidays with me to see if I could get used to it. People come up to it and order two pints", said Mr. Carroll, who with his wife, Beryl, runs the Rose and Crown, opposite Ilkley Parish Church.

Leeds nostalgia: July 1976: Former rugby league player ‘gets used to living with himself’