Leeds nostalgia: Buskers from the 1980s

Leeds. 17th June 1984

Some of the best buskers in the city brought music to the ears of shoppers and passers-by in Leeds at the weekend, as they took part in a "play-off" to decide who will perform at the Lord Mayor's Charity Gala Concert next weekend.

Eight talented street acts gathered at the Garden of Rest, outside Leeds Central Library to entertain the crowds who were enjoying a sunny afternoon.

First on the bill was a busker who has been further than most to pursue his "art".

L.R. Airey , of Otley Road, Leeds, who performs under the name of Leo, is a singer / guitarist who has toured the Shetlands plus folk clubs in the Falklands, as well as Antarctic bases.

Each busker was given 10 minutes to impress the judges in the competition, organised by Leeds Leisure Services in association with the Yorkshire Evening Post.

Without any instrumental assistance 84-year-old Franke Hall, of Lidgett Towers, Leeds, sang a collection of old songs with just a walking stick and trilby hat as his only props - a perfor
Leeds. 17th June 1984 Some of the best buskers in the city brought music to the ears of shoppers and passers-by in Leeds at the weekend, as they took part in a "play-off" to decide who will perform at the Lord Mayor's Charity Gala Concert next weekend. Eight talented street acts gathered at the Garden of Rest, outside Leeds Central Library to entertain the crowds who were enjoying a sunny afternoon. First on the bill was a busker who has been further than most to pursue his "art". L.R. Airey , of Otley Road, Leeds, who performs under the name of Leo, is a singer / guitarist who has toured the Shetlands plus folk clubs in the Falklands, as well as Antarctic bases. Each busker was given 10 minutes to impress the judges in the competition, organised by Leeds Leisure Services in association with the Yorkshire Evening Post. Without any instrumental assistance 84-year-old Franke Hall, of Lidgett Towers, Leeds, sang a collection of old songs with just a walking stick and trilby hat as his only props - a perfor
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Music is in the air for this week’s trawl through our picture archives, as buskers line up to compete for the chance to play in front of the mayor of Leeds.

Our main picture, taken on June 17, 1984, shows some of the best buskers in the city bringing music to the ears of shoppers and passers-by, as they took part in a “play-off” to decide who will perform at the Lord Mayor’s Charity Gala Concert the following weekend.

Hull. 9th August 1987

Streets Ahead:  Hull buskers Angie Lumb and Johnny Cox woo the crowds that gathered for Hull Council's first competition at the weekend.  The contest, sponsored by the National and Local Government Officers' Association, attracted 18 entries for a first prize of �100.

Hull. 9th August 1987 Streets Ahead: Hull buskers Angie Lumb and Johnny Cox woo the crowds that gathered for Hull Council's first competition at the weekend. The contest, sponsored by the National and Local Government Officers' Association, attracted 18 entries for a first prize of �100.

Eight talented street acts gathered at the Garden of Rest, outside Leeds Central Library to entertain the crowds who were enjoying a sunny afternoon. First on the bill was a busker who has been further than most to pursue his “art”.

L R. Airey, of Otley Road, who performed under the name of Leo, was a singer/guitarist who toured the Shetlands and folk clubs in the Falklands.

Each busker was given 10 minutes to impress the judges in the competition, organised by Leeds Leisure Services in association with the YEP.

Without any instrumental assistance 84-year-old Franke Hall, of Lidgett Towers, Leeds, sang a collection of old songs with just a walking stick and trilby hat as his only props - a performance which attracted friendly cheers from the crowd. Also singing unaccompanied was Danny Freeman, of Oakwood Avenue, Leeds, who gave a rousing rendition of “Edelwiess” to please the spectators.

Often seen at pubs and clubs in the Leeds area, there was also Ken Eagleton, of Carrholm Drive, Chapel-Allerton. Pictured are The Two Buskateers, Robert Hunt and Neil Clay, in action.

The second picture is from Hull on August 9, 1987: buskers Angie Lumb and Johnny Cox woo the crowds that gathered for Hull Council’s first competition.

The contest attracted 18 entries for a first prize of £100.

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